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The next generation of Python programmers

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 26, 2014 14:23 UTC (Sat) by nix (subscriber, #2304)
In reply to: The next generation of Python programmers by neilbrown
Parent article: The next generation of Python programmers

Quite.

The first great mistake was throwing away the (relatively new) concept of the pipeline when windowing systems came in. Without the ability to even instruct the machine to do the simplest things in sequence, the user interface has just got cruder ever since then. (Macro languages do *not* help: you have to be a programmer of some stripe to even start to use them without being scared off.)

There is surely a graphical way to model this -- I am reliably told that the original PARC windowing system had one -- but apparently it was dropped :(


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The next generation of Python programmers

Posted May 1, 2014 22:41 UTC (Thu) by smorrow (guest, #95721) [Link]

IPC other than pipes clearly exists, but pipe is the only one that non-programmers know about. Why is this? Maybe because programs have to be specially written to use other forms of IPC, but pipes just work everywhere.

If that's the single most important thing about pipes (is it not?), then what's the GUI equivalent of that? Copy and paste is the closest thing I can think of.

It's too bad most research in HCI seems more concerned with tacky things like virtual/augmented reality.

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted May 6, 2014 12:12 UTC (Tue) by k8to (subscriber, #15413) [Link]

There were many attempts in the 90s to do gui forms of IPC. The commercial variations were things like OLE embedding, OpenDoc(TM), HotLinks, Publish/Subscribe. They all felt much clumsier than they were worth and were stability nightmares.

There were some more researchy things like oberon and smalltalk, but I don't know how close to practical they ever became.


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