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The next generation of Python programmers

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 25, 2014 7:01 UTC (Fri) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: The next generation of Python programmers by neilbrown
Parent article: The next generation of Python programmers

> I think that modern UI design actually makes it harder for users to gain that understanding. Details are hidden, boundaries are blurred. This is done in the cause of making it easy to use. Maybe it succeeds in the short-term but by hiding details it makes it hard to see and learn the underlying model and so hard to progress beyond a simple understanding.

a GUI is like training wheels, it is a great help to get you started, but eventually it tends to limit what you can do.

keyboard shortcuts are a start at bypassing the training wheels, but only a start


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The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 25, 2014 16:12 UTC (Fri) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

Any program is going to be limited in how it operates by the imagination of the person who designed it, this is a fundamental nature of computer software, it only can do what it was programmed to do, how it was programmed to do it, it's hard to get emergent or flexible behavior out of someone else's program. The only way to be truly flexible is to write your own software.

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted May 1, 2014 18:42 UTC (Thu) by smorrow (guest, #95721) [Link]

>> I think that modern UI design actually makes it harder for users to gain that understanding.
> a GUI is like training wheels, it is a great help to get you started, but eventually it tends to limit what you can do.

Agreed.

> keyboard shortcuts are a start at bypassing the training wheels, but only a start

I have no idea what you're trying to get at with this. If you'd have said a command line, I'd see what you mean -- for a tastefully-designed (stdin/out) command-line program, once you know how to use it interactively, you also know how to use it in a script: `ed(browse) < ./oneIwrote.earlier` or `generatecommands | ed(browse)`, you can also be sure what the behaviour's going to be if you type-ahead at it while it's busy, you can also use the mouse to copy and paste commands as well as just data, etc, etc -- but keyboard shortcuts? What's the advantage? (Other than speed, which is less important than power, generality, transparency, ...) Keyboard shortcuts isn't a fundamentally different/better paradigm from GUI - most keyboard shortcuts correspond to menu items, and are about as flexible, in that you can't compose them together or arrange for them to be called in a loop or whatever. Ctrl-O isn't an improvement over File>Open in any way that I can see, but a proper command line's equivalent of ^O would get you glob, variable, and backtick substitution.


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