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The next generation of Python programmers

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 23, 2014 20:59 UTC (Wed) by b7j0c (guest, #27559)
In reply to: The next generation of Python programmers by rahulsundaram
Parent article: The next generation of Python programmers

go out and talk to anyone using python in production in the real world and you'll see practically everyone is still on 2.x, which almost certainly was the motivation for BDFL's new python2 stack


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The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 24, 2014 2:24 UTC (Thu) by idupree (guest, #71169) [Link]

I use python3 to generate my website. I had been writing code compatible with both 2 and 3. The new features in 3 became too useful to justify keeping python2 compatibility, since it's trivial to install 3 in all current distros these days and in my experience most important libs support 3 already. (python3 features including `yield from` and asyncio, os.makedirs(..., exist_ok=True), `nonlocal`, etc. Some are easier to work around the lack of than others :-) )

Old projects started before python3 was created are certainly important. For new projects, I think python3 compatibility is practical and likely to improve your life in the future.

Even with the python2/3 compatibility break, python + included batteries is still a more stable platform for me than many options (nodejs/ruby/c++/haskell) and a more modern language than others (C, bash). This is why I choose python (2∩3, or 3) for my scripting projects that I occasionally modify and hope to keep working for a decade with minimal effort.

If I had to choose between python3 and ipv6 deployment, though, I would choose ipv6: python is not as critical to the survival of an open internet.

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 24, 2014 4:07 UTC (Thu) by mathstuf (subscriber, #69389) [Link]

> If I had to choose between python3 and ipv6 deployment

Fortunately, you don't :) . The answer of the masses so far seems to be "neither" :( .

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 24, 2014 9:59 UTC (Thu) by khim (subscriber, #9252) [Link]

Actually IPv6 users comprise about 3% of users today. It'll be interesting to know where we are with python 2-to-3 translation. It feels like we are at about the same stage which, indeed, does not inspire confidence: IPv4-to-IPv6 introduced a severe breakage because it was just impossible to continue with IPv4, but why do the same in python2-to-python3 transition?

The next generation of Python programmers

Posted Apr 24, 2014 2:37 UTC (Thu) by rahulsundaram (subscriber, #21946) [Link]

Traction is slower than expected perhaps but moving forward. I certainly see more people discussing it and evaluating it (and yes, that is the "real world") which wasn't possible when some of the major frameworks didn't support it. People with custom codebases won't migrate anytime soon if at all but notion of zero traction isn't representative.


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