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A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion

A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion

Posted Jan 29, 2014 17:26 UTC (Wed) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198)
In reply to: A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion by paulj
Parent article: A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion

inetd services are very simple, usually just forking a new process for each incoming connection, which doesn't scale on the big internet of today. I think it might have been more of a bridge to get applications on the network easily without writing network code, now most network apps have their own socket handling code. In the systemd case, it can startup services on demand which are long running and have their own socket handling code, which is kind of the best of both approaches. It probably won't be used for everything or even most things, but the few apps which benefit will have the feature available, for example SSH can defer until startup until the first incoming connection, and maybe even shutdown after a period of idleness, saving resources without affecting availability.


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A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion

Posted Jan 29, 2014 17:43 UTC (Wed) by paulj (subscriber, #341) [Link]

Inetd processes could persist. There generally wasn't a convention for also handing over listen sockets, so this was only useful on connectionless sockets / UDP. However, had there been a demand, handing over the listen socket could have been implemented easily, just as systemd does.

So, given the benefits, it's just weird that there wasn't more take-up of this. I agree socket activation is a good thing, and it'll be nice if systemd makes it fashionable again. I'm just curious why it didn't stay fashionable the last time around?

A call for votes in the Debian init system discussion

Posted Jan 29, 2014 17:52 UTC (Wed) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

My opinion is that as UNIX became more popular with hardware vendors there was a greater push for standardization and portability, and enterprise support, which caused many services to get frozen in time with no new features added and no compatibility breaks allowed. Stagnation which has persisted until recently.


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