User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

This is a solution which lacks a problem.

This is a solution which lacks a problem.

Posted Jan 20, 2014 13:15 UTC (Mon) by davecb (subscriber, #1574)
Parent article: Supporting connected standby

I don't use a machine for notifications when the machine is suspended. Indeed, I doubt I'm even near it when it's suspended.

I do want it to "hit the ground running" when I turn it on, so apps that get messages while suspended, such as email, messaging and calendars, should become (more) suspend-aware.

Push notifications like messaging and (server-side) smtp mail could benefit from connected standby, but only moderately: there's lots of time to get up to speed while I'm reading the first message/email/whatever.

This is a genuinely good idea for a phone, or a Dick Tracy wristwatch radio, but a solution looking in vain for a problem on a laptop or desktop.


(Log in to post comments)

This is a solution which lacks a problem.

Posted Jan 26, 2014 20:45 UTC (Sun) by marcH (subscriber, #57642) [Link]

> Push notifications like messaging and (server-side) smtp mail could benefit from connected standby, but only moderately: there's lots of time to get up to speed while I'm reading the first message/email/whatever.

You are assuming you are on line everywhere all the time. On our phones we appreciate having everything always synced and reasonably up to date even when we have no connectivity.

> This is a genuinely good idea for a phone, or a Dick Tracy wristwatch radio, but a solution looking in vain for a problem on a laptop or desktop.

The lines are blurring between phones, tablets, 2-in-1, chromebooks,... eventually I suspect systems will be more defined by how we use them rather than by whatever sticker was put on them in the shop. In this respect: implement Connected Standby everywhere and let the users decide if they need or not.

This is a solution which lacks a problem.

Posted Jan 26, 2014 23:31 UTC (Sun) by davecb (subscriber, #1574) [Link]

Actually I'm not assuming I'm on line everywhere and always: I'm assuming I'm the reverse.

As to devices, I quite agree with you: let me make it a little stronger, in fact...

I speculate my wristwatch will be on-line all the time, and probably also contain at least the checksums for my private keys. That in effect is what makes it a wristwatch.

The strap that I use to firmly attach it to me defines it's use, not the label on it. The form factor also has a fair bit to do with it, but the innards are mostly phone bits. Probably from the phone a friend's daughter had, which I mistook for a brooch.

Similarly the phone is defined by my either holding it to my head, or by the form factor of the stargate/"person of interest" earphone it drives. The laptop is the thing big enough for a keyboard that I can actually type on, so it's used when I want to type more than a one-liner.

That leaves current (largish) phones and various sizes of pad for short messages, IM and one-liner emails.

They all overlap somewhere, courtesy of Linux.

--dave


Copyright © 2017, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds