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Wayland explanations are STILL confusing and worrying users

Wayland explanations are STILL confusing and worrying users

Posted Jun 19, 2013 13:56 UTC (Wed) by nye (guest, #51576)
In reply to: Wayland explanations are STILL confusing and worrying users by Jonno
Parent article: The Wayland Situation: Facts About X vs. Wayland (Phoronix)

>Actually, the VNC *protocol* are fully capable of efficient scrolling, but most VNC server *implementations* work by doing screen scraping and don't have any heuristics to detect scrolling, thus resulting in terrible performance.

Now *that* is interesting information. Perhaps I'm reading too much into your choice of the word 'most', but does that mean you know of VNC servers which are better in this regard? And do they require a matching client?


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Wayland explanations are STILL confusing and worrying users

Posted Jun 19, 2013 14:47 UTC (Wed) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

I wonder how the OSX client/server rate, in my experience the pair is very good but VNC performance using another client is poor. It may be using these optimizations because performance is fairly good. Scrolling terminals isn't slow.

Wayland explanations are STILL confusing and worrying users

Posted Jun 19, 2013 15:28 UTC (Wed) by Jonno (subscriber, #49613) [Link]

> Perhaps I'm reading too much into your choice of the word 'most', but does that mean you know of VNC servers which are better in this regard?
Most VNC servers make some use of the protocol feature (i.e. for window movement on the virtual desktop), but to my knowledge no X11-based VNC server is capable of automatically using the feature when scrolling part of a window.

That said, libVNCServer makes it available to custom applications, and x11vnc has an experimental command line option to try to detect scrolling in the frames it scrapes from the X11 server.

> And do they require a matching client?
The "CopyRect" image encoding is one of the five original encodings of the specification, but only the "Raw" image encoding (uncompressed bitmap data) is mandated, everything else is negotiated per session. So while most clients support it, some might not.


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