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Here is the point that does not work:

Here is the point that does not work:

Posted May 14, 2013 22:39 UTC (Tue) by jmorris42 (guest, #2203)
In reply to: Here is the point that does not work: by dlang
Parent article: A proposal for an always-releasable Debian

Agreed. I see it more as a threat. That if you want version X in testing you had better be prepared to fix any problems that turn up in it lest it be tossed back out again along with anything that relied on your assertion that it was ready. The threat of reverting a bunch of dependencies should create the urgency needed to get somebody interested enough to fix most problems.

The goal really should be zero discovered RC bugs existing longer than a month. Yes the point of testing is to find the bugs but if people spent half the time making sure what they did last year actually worked instead of the next new shiny thing the world would be a lot better place. Any policy change that creates social pressure in that direction is a good thing.

We long since achieved a point where we can have a basic desktop or server that is feature complete enough to be useful. The problem is the eternal churn, where things keep breaking. Packages that used to work are discarded because they won't build and nobody cares enough about backward compat to make it worth the outsized effort to fix. Because if we don't follow Microsoft's lead off the Windows 8 cliff and remake everything into a tablet we won't have 'The Year of Linux on the Desktop.' Or something.

Yes progress is still worthwhile, everything that can be invented hasn't been invented. But we should be at a point where we can afford to tell people trying to push yet another rewrite of a core component that no, we aren't interested until it can actually replace the perfectly good software we have now.


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