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ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed

ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed

Posted Apr 11, 2013 18:39 UTC (Thu) by endecotp (guest, #36428)
In reply to: ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed by mjg59
Parent article: ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed

> USE OF THIS SOFTWARE IS RESTRICTED TO PERSONS AND ORGANIZATIONS
> WHO CAN AND WILL TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY AND ALL LOSSES,
> COSTS, OR OTHER PROBLEMS ARISING FROM ITS USE.

That looks to me like a "not-written-by-a-lawyer" clause.

For example, if I'm not a "person" or an "organization", I'm not allowed to use it.

Lesson to the rest of us: look at the existing "tried and tested" licences and choose the one that is closest to what you want. Don't write your own.

I'm guessing this code is fairly old, and I suspect that would be less likely to happen today.


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ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed

Posted Apr 11, 2013 20:01 UTC (Thu) by rahvin (subscriber, #16953) [Link]

I agree, very non lawyer phrase. The typical no warranty phrase is court tested. I suspect that this phrase would be found to be contradictory or contrary to law.

There are half a dozen ways to read that, half a dozen other ways to satisfy it without meeting it's conditions and absolutely no way to enforce it. I'd expect a judge to strike it, and if the rest of the license doesn't contain a sever-ability clause the whole license would be ruled null. To me the real question is does the owner of the copyright even care? Do they even exist anymore?

ARM kernel floating-point emulation code removed

Posted Jun 16, 2013 15:15 UTC (Sun) by Jandar (subscriber, #85683) [Link]

> if the rest of the license doesn't contain a sever-ability clause the whole license would be ruled null.

This depends on the local legal system. In my country the boiler-plate sever-ability clause hasn't to be written into any legal wording it's implicit by law.


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