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Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries

Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries

Posted Mar 14, 2013 19:14 UTC (Thu) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries by nye
Parent article: Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries

> Really not even remotely the same. The RPi is an exceptionally closed platform; in order to do anything with it you need to use Broadcom's binaries.

show me anything along the lines of the following tutorial
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/freshers/raspberrypi/tutorials/os/

Also, since the broadcom chip is sold for embedded uses, you can get everything you need from broadcom to develop your own code to replace the Pi foundation provided (note, not broadcom provided) bootloader binaries.

Frankly, I wish that the source for this was available, but given the current patent mess, the choice is betwen providing this bootloader as a binary, or having to pay patent licensing fees for the video codecs in every Pi sold. And in this situation I prefer keeping the price down to given money to the patent extortionists like MPEG-LA.

And since this is on the SD card, it's always possible for this to change in the future. Either the patent mess could change, or someone else could write a replacement bootloader and make it available.

While I fully understand the feeling that this is not ideal, calling something that has put over a million devices running Linux into people's hands "and enemy of Free Software" is cutting off your nose to spite your face.


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Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries

Posted Mar 18, 2013 13:02 UTC (Mon) by nye (guest, #51576) [Link]

>While I fully understand the feeling that this is not ideal, calling something that has put over a million devices running Linux into people's hands "and enemy of Free Software" is cutting off your nose to spite your face.

If that were the only criterion, we would laud TiVo as a far greater force for free software.

Regardless, the thing that really upsets me about the RPi is the level of double-speak that comes from the foundation. If they were to acknowledge how closed their platform is in comparison to a standard PC that would be one thing, but to keep beating the drum about how open and amazing they are leaves a bitter taste.

Also, they've been pretty unpleasant to people who have anything critical to say about the project (and I don't mean me; I mean people who are more polite). The effect has been to give me a very powerful impression that they don't really care about openness at all except as far as it can be used for marketing purposes.

Loading keys from Microsoft PE binaries

Posted Mar 18, 2013 23:29 UTC (Mon) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

First off, I think Tivo shipping was a very important milestone in the domination of Linux. Before that there were not a lot of Linux based home appliances, they demonstrated that Linux could work in large scale deployments to people's houses (and for years afterwords I still had arguments with people claiming that Linux could not be used in that type of environment)

Second, the Pi allows you to run with everything running in the Linux space being open source, this is FAR better than most computers with reasonable graphics do.

If you are so worried about how the binary blob in the GPU can access the memory that the Linux kernel uses, then you had better not have any PCI cards (especially not any PCI graphics cards) in your desktop PC, because the binary blob firmware running on any PCI attached device can access any memory in the system (unless you are using IOMMU and the device driver has been written to limit the hardware)

Would it be better if the bootloader/GPU firmware was open? of course it would be.

As for the reaction from the people at the Pi foundation to 'polite' criticism, given the abuse that they have suffered, I think it's a matter of the well being poisoned, after being abused by so many obnoxious people, their patience is long gone and they don't react well to anyone. This doesn't mean that they don't care about openess, it's just part of human nature.

> If they were to acknowledge how closed their platform is in comparison to a standard PC that would be one thing

I don't believe that their system is closed compared to a standard PC, so I can easily see how they don't either.


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