User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

Should be: Goodnight, Perl 6.

Should be: Goodnight, Perl 6.

Posted Feb 13, 2013 17:59 UTC (Wed) by andrel (guest, #5166)
In reply to: Should be: Goodnight, Perl 6. by raiph
Parent article: Chromatic: Goodnight, Parrot

Have there been psychology experiments proving that understanding the different syntax uses a different part of the brain, or is that still informed conjecture?


(Log in to post comments)

Should be: Goodnight, Perl 6.

Posted Feb 13, 2013 19:21 UTC (Wed) by raiph (guest, #89283) [Link]

> Have there been psychology experiments proving that understanding the different syntax uses a different part of the brain, or is that still informed conjecture?

Aiui there have been lots of brain scan experiments demonstrating that understanding spoken natural language uses different synaptic circuits to process different syntax elements. I hope to get some time to find more useful answers to your question this weekend and post back in this thread.

Use of our natural language processing neural mechanisms for reading, writing, understanding computer languages

Posted Mar 7, 2013 21:27 UTC (Thu) by raiph (guest, #89283) [Link]

I've just hunted around starting from a google for "understanding syntax" "brain scans". I've not yet found stuff specifically discussing how natural language syntax processing neural mechanisms impact our processing of computer language, but here's one that A) confirms use of some such mechanism in processing of music notation and B) suggests that such mechanisms would/can also be used used in reading, writing, understanding computer languages.

"These combined results suggest that [an area of the brain], known to be crucial for syntax processing in [natural] language, plays also a functional role in the processing of musical syntax. Hence, the present findings are consistent with the notion that Broca's area supports the processing of syntax in a rather domain-general way." (from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20570253)


Copyright © 2018, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds