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Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Posted Jan 31, 2013 16:37 UTC (Thu) by Aliasundercover (subscriber, #69009)
Parent article: Seigo: Plasma.next()?

When I see words along the lines of "not expose the hierarchical file system" I anticipate the need to learn yet another file system with new and different rules and methods. The need for a file system never goes away, we must store things and find them again. Perhaps a simple and constrained appliance can benefit from a focused design. Still, different always starts out behind as existing knowledge and habits don't apply.

Personally I hate tags and like the hierarchical design. I like grouping corresponding things together and being able to handle them all as a unit. That and a name is usually all I need. Entering or managing tags is unwelcome.

Ever notice how every microwave oven is different from every other one? They seem to burn out once a season in my office so we get to see lots of different ones. They are all so different only the most dedicated lunch cookers bother learning how to do more than turn them on and off. The latest one even takes some fishing around to find which button means off assuming one does not want to trust the safety interlock and simply open the door in frustration. I think the people who design these things have a club. Anyone who makes a new microwave oven to work like an old microwave oven gets thrown out of the club in shame.

The hierarchical file system is a great success in computing. I wish designers would embrace it, not try to hide it in shame.


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Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Posted Feb 1, 2013 14:21 UTC (Fri) by HelloWorld (guest, #56129) [Link]

Tags offer a superset of the functionality that a hierarchical structure can offer, because a file's path (including its name) can be seen as simply another tag. "list the contents of directory /foo/bar" then becomes "list all files whose path tag begins with /foo/bar/". So in fact, you're already entering and managing tags.

otoh, in a hierarchical structure it's often not clear where a file belongs. Where do I put the images that belong to my bachelor's thesis, in ~/thesis or in ~/images? This kind of thing crops up all the time.

Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Posted Feb 1, 2013 20:20 UTC (Fri) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

> Tags offer a superset of the functionality that a hierarchical structure can offer, because a file's path (including its name) can be seen as simply another tag.

This is true, but what people are objecting to is tagging and depriciating the filesystem hierarchy.

I don't think anyone is objecting to tags being available (they just question how well they work in practice, with examples of when they don't)

Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Posted Feb 4, 2013 15:56 UTC (Mon) by micka (subscriber, #38720) [Link]

> Where do I put the images that belong to my bachelor's thesis, in ~/thesis or in ~/images

Very clearly ~/thesis, because I don't want to see the images related to my thesis with my hinking photos.

Actually, their location is also constrained because the build system for my thesis expects them at a specific place.

> because a file's path (including its name) can be seen as simply another tag

But sometimes, a specific case is easier to understand and use than the general case. And I think that's the case for hierarchy compared to tags.

Seigo: Plasma.next()?

Posted Feb 13, 2013 20:28 UTC (Wed) by hasard (guest, #47410) [Link]

I would not like to use tags the way you suggest:

$ find ~/ -mindepth 2 -type d | wc -l
20575

This indicates that (even not counting the base level of the hierarchy to avoid counting all the .config/ directories), I would have to deal with a flat list of 20575 tags. On the other hand, in each directory I most of the times do not have more than about ten or twenty objects (some may be directories).

Using a flat list of tags works well if their number can be kept reasonably low. Once their number grows, hierarchy becomes useful again (gmail uses hierarchical tags for instance).


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