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Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 30, 2013 11:27 UTC (Wed) by Trelane (subscriber, #56877)
In reply to: Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture by samlh
Parent article: Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

> If other people had the right to use and sell my hard work with no recompense, not only would I be angry, I would likely not code at all.

Then you should stop producing Free Software right now. Others can both use and sell your Free software without recompense. See also, Red Hat.

In a world without copyright, I would continue to produce software in a world without the GPL. It's not like I receive remuneration for Free software that I produce now, nor that others bundle and resell.

I would _not_, however, release the source code except to close, trustworthy friends. If others were to want to find out the secret sauce, they'd have to reverse-engineer it, like they do now.


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Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 30, 2013 15:09 UTC (Wed) by samlh (subscriber, #56788) [Link]

> Then you should stop producing Free Software right now. Others can both use and sell your Free software without recompense. See also, Red Hat.
>
> In a world without copyright, I would continue to produce software in a world without the GPL. It's not like I receive remuneration for Free software that I produce now, nor that others bundle and resell.

Just because the recompense is intangible, that doesn't mean it isn't there. With the GPL, I am getting the satisfaction of contributing to a common pool, and thanking the original author for distributing under a free license. The copyleft provisions prevent unequal contributions--Red Hat releases the changes they make to the GPL software they use.

BSD is a tougher argument, and I contribute to fewer BSD projects as a result.

I support the right for people to *volunteer* to contribute to free software; I do not support not having the right to decide.

> I would _not_, however, release the source code except to close, trustworthy friends. If others were to want to find out the secret sauce, they'd have to reverse-engineer it, like they do now.

If someone broke into your server, anyone could use the source code without penalty, and you'd be up shit creek. You'll have no rights to the source code, and while the first person could get in trouble for hacking, everyone else who got your code could do as they wished with it.

Finally, you are ignoring other fields such as literature or music where there is no secret sauce to keep hidden. As an avid reader, I realize that today authors don't make that much money, and publishing is not a particularly high profit-margin business. Take away the ability for an author to sell to multiple people and far fewer authors will make enough to live on.

Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 30, 2013 18:36 UTC (Wed) by khim (subscriber, #9252) [Link]

Finally, you are ignoring other fields such as literature or music where there is no secret sauce to keep hidden.

Literature and music existed for thousands of years without copyright which makes this discussion quite surreal.

I'm not sure abandonment of copyright will stop development of programs but it sure as hell will not not stop creation of new literature and music works.

As an avid reader, I realize that today authors don't make that much money, and publishing is not a particularly high profit-margin business. Take away the ability for an author to sell to multiple people and far fewer authors will make enough to live on.

And this is bad thing... exactly why? Sure, amount of throw-away literature will go down, but I'm not convinced that good authors (you know, the ones who people really like) will not be able to sell nothing. Yes, it's harder with books as compared to music (music is supported by live concerts just fine), but then it's cheaper to create, too.

And, again, I'm not saying that it's always a bad deal to use copyright as subsidy to authors, but we should never forget that it's form of subsidy, not a natural right.


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