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Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 30, 2013 10:05 UTC (Wed) by ewan (subscriber, #5533)
In reply to: Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture by samlh
Parent article: Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

"Indeed, the best way I know if for things to get assigned value is through the free market."

I'm sorry - are you arguing for a free market, or are you arguing for massive government intervention to prohibit some forms of activity in favour of creating an entirely artificial scarcity as state support for other kinds of activity?


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Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 30, 2013 15:32 UTC (Wed) by samlh (subscriber, #56788) [Link]

You cannot have a successful free market if there is no incentive not to steal. Most everyone agrees that physical labor to produce a product should be protected. Why should intellectual labor not be protected as well?

You also seem to imply that government regulation is a bad thing, a priori. Government simply enforces societal norms as codified through law. I, for one, support the belief that creators should be rewarded for creating.

Villa: Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture

Posted Jan 31, 2013 5:53 UTC (Thu) by blujay (guest, #39961) [Link]

Where did you get the idea that the link between society and government is such a one-way street? And who decides what is a norm? The list of governments which have recreated their societies as their leaders pleased is nearly endless, not to mention the real governments which exist today all over the world which oppress their citizens every day according to the whims of those in power. Your utopia doesn't exist in the real world. There is no such altruistic, norm-codifying government on the face of the planet.


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