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Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 27, 2013 10:31 UTC (Sun) by Klavs (guest, #10563)
In reply to: Poettering: The Biggest Myths by lkundrak
Parent article: Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Seconded - I generelly get tired of people feeling the right to continuously critize what other people do - instead of just providing something better themselves. It's much easier to complain, than code!

It's fine to try influcence other developers, and come up with well-argued opinions - but in the end it's the coders that decide what they code and the users the decide what they use.

pls. stop wasting everybodys time with meaningless argueing.


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Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 27, 2013 11:53 UTC (Sun) by drago01 (subscriber, #50715) [Link]

The thing is that people are afraid of change because they fear that their knowledge becomes useless. (such a sysadmin is by definition not a sysadmin)

Most of the criticism is based on buzzwords that have no real meaning "this is bloat" ... "xyz has been like this for 30 years" ... "this is not UNIX like" ...

Sure this sounds harsh but it is a good theory to explain the irrational arguments that you keep reading on the internet on such topics.

Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 27, 2013 21:39 UTC (Sun) by misc (subscriber, #73730) [Link]

Not only. While I usually like changes, that's also because I enjoy being a sysadmin. Now, if for some reason, you do not enjoy the job, but someone had to do it, maybe learning your way on Linux was not so great. Maybe you know that you will not have time to learn new ways.

Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 28, 2013 18:19 UTC (Mon) by ThinkRob (subscriber, #64513) [Link]

> The thing is that people are afraid of change because they fear that their knowledge becomes useless. (such a sysadmin is by definition not a sysadmin)

It's not a "fear of change" (which is a ridiculous thing in the first place...) or a "fear that [our] knowledge becomes useless" ('cause if that were the issue we wouldn't be in the IT field). It's just that some of us don't like changes when they bring no benefits that matter to us yet require us to re-learn a bunch of stuff that just generally worked "well enough" for a couple decades.

Yes, it's not a huge deal, but it's still a pain, especially when the previous implementation was satisfactory.

Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 28, 2013 20:58 UTC (Mon) by HelloWorld (guest, #56129) [Link]

Most of what worked with sysvinit still works with systemd. init scripts work, /dev/initctl works, utilities like service(8) from Fedora/RHEL work, even runlevels are emulated to the degree that's possible. So please, where *exactly* is the alleged "pain" you're talking about?

Poettering: The Biggest Myths

Posted Jan 28, 2013 21:13 UTC (Mon) by davidstrauss (subscriber, #85867) [Link]

> It's just that some of us don't like changes when they bring no benefits that matter to us yet require us to re-learn a bunch of stuff that just generally worked "well enough" for a couple decades.

It's not clear what requires immediate re-learning with systemd unless the administrator has a habit of directly altering rc.d symlinks, which hasn't been a best practice for a long time.

Existing init scripts work, unaltered, with systemd. Enabling and disabling services with chkconfig maps transparently to the proper operation in systemd. Mounts configured in fstab come over, automatically, as mount units and can continue to be managed the same way as before.

None of those compatibility features is going away any time soon.

And, for admins wanting to transition to the native tools, extensive documentation and guides [1] exist.

If that's not good enough for you and you can't appreciate the value these tools provide to others, I can only describe your attitude toward keeping SysV init as selfish. The FOSS world doesn't owe you stagnation once it's met your needs.


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