User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

What GPL/EU compatibility is needed?

What GPL/EU compatibility is needed?

Posted Dec 23, 2012 15:26 UTC (Sun) by Jan_Zerebecki (guest, #70319)
In reply to: What GPL/EU compatibility is needed? by pboddie
Parent article: European Union's open source license to become compatible with GPLv3

I think the end user of software should not need to understand, read or accept the license if it is free software. I haven't thought too long about this but I couldn't come up with why a sane free software license would require acceptance from the softwares user. Can you?

Telling the user that free software and culture is great is something totally different because it shouldn't involve licenses.

Usually companies do not want their customers to understand end-user agreements and TOS and such things because otherwise the customer would understand that the company does not care about the interests of the customer at all. Perhaps http://tos-dr.info/ will be able to help. (Yes there are exceptions, like unusually understandable TOS, free software companies, companies that try hard to behave in ethical ways, etc. But those are not the majority.)

If one were to turn the tos-dr.info concept top down and templateize and modularize TOS (that would be the DSL aproach to law) only the templates and related documentation need to be translated once. But I guess the majority of lawyers would probably fight something like this like their lives depended on it, because their profit depends on it.


(Log in to post comments)

What GPL/EU compatibility is needed?

Posted Dec 23, 2012 18:42 UTC (Sun) by mjg59 (subscriber, #23239) [Link]

Using free software should always be free of restrictions that are going to affect the vast majority of users. However, one of the vaunted freedoms is the freedom to pass on copies of free software to other users, and various licenses do impose restrictions on that act that may impact common cases.


Copyright © 2018, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds