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UEFI secure boot kernel restrictions

UEFI secure boot kernel restrictions

Posted Nov 8, 2012 9:33 UTC (Thu) by paulj (subscriber, #341)
Parent article: UEFI secure boot kernel restrictions

I like the idea of having a secure boot. However, having a secure boot where the trust anchor is an entity that has radically different, if not conflicting goals and requirements to those of Linux users is a risky proposition. I fear there are only 2 stable, extreme outcomes to this:

a) Linux becomes a heavily locked down software eco-system.

b) Linux becomes non-bootable on common hardware.

The middle-ground some seek, I'm not sure is achievable by accepting a scheme that has such an other entity as trust anchor.


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UEFI secure boot kernel restrictions

Posted Nov 12, 2012 7:33 UTC (Mon) by Seegras (guest, #20463) [Link]

> b) Linux becomes non-bootable on common hardware.

I don't consider any of this UEFI-locking to be a technical problem. It's an antitrust-problem.

Because the reason Microsoft does it is obviously because it tries to lock out competition.

So the first thing needed to combat this, is to abolish any law that protects this kind of shenanigans, namely the DRM anti-circumvention provisions of the DMCA and similar laws. And the second step is to go in with anitrust law. hard.


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