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LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic)

LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic)

Posted Nov 5, 2012 7:11 UTC (Mon) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic) by edomaur
Parent article: LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic)

yes and no.

they can merge, but it will involve abandoning one of the forks.

The LO fork has quite a bit of development work that's gone on while the AOO fork has been going through it's management issues. It would have been very easy from a technical point of view for the people who have been expending effort on AOO to start working on LO instead.

The real problem here is the conflict between people and management approaches. The LO people left OOo while it was still managed by Sun/Oracle because they were ordered away. That leaves them understanably resentful and unwilling to give up the work they've done to go back and join the project that booted them out (especially since they've been so successful on their own) There is a real question of what value (other than the name) the Apache OO project has over the LO project.

In theory, their advantage is the companies are willing to contribute to AOO, but we don't yet have much that's been contributed,


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LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic)

Posted Nov 5, 2012 8:32 UTC (Mon) by mjw (subscriber, #16740) [Link]

When I look at the libreoffice git repository it seems like if aoo has some bug fix that isn't in libreoffice already then they do pick it up and credit the aoo hacker who fixed it. It doesn't seem to happen the other way around (but aoo uses svn which is a bit harder to quickly grep through). It also looks like there is very little development going on at apache anyway (if you ignore the wiki/website stuff). One or two commits a day. So I assume some libreoffice hacker just goes over the commits every couple of weeks and picks up anything that looks interesting. The LibreOffice developer statistics The Document Foundation publishes also show they still import some of their commits from the former ooo code base in the last year. So in a technical sense I do think they are kind of merged.

http://documentfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/tdf...

Which is a fun document. Apparently you can embed ODF in a PDF file. So if you open that PDF with libreoffice then you can edit the data directly. Nice idea.

LibreOffice and OpenOffice clash over user numbers (OStatic)

Posted Nov 5, 2012 11:06 UTC (Mon) by Otus (subscriber, #67685) [Link]

> It doesn't seem to happen the other way around

It can't. AOO uses a more permissive license so LO can take their patches,
but not the other way around.

Their advantage is companies are willing to contribute

Posted Nov 5, 2012 12:26 UTC (Mon) by Wol (guest, #4433) [Link]

Which will vanish *when* (if it hasn't been completed already) the LO codebase goes truly LGPL/MPL.

Once that's done companies will be able to take the LO codebase and build proprietary stuff on it. Or do dumps into the codebase if that's what they want.

Cheers,
Wol

Their advantage is companies are willing to contribute

Posted Nov 5, 2012 14:33 UTC (Mon) by Tom6 (guest, #60418) [Link]

Hi :)
Adding their own stuff outside of one of the core projects doesn't necessarily mean feeding those additions back into either core project. Of course if they don't feed it back in then they have a much tinier number of people doing QA and then beta testing so it's a bit of a balancing act for them.

From a quality pov it's better to add "upstream" directly into whichever project but from a "keeping the secrets" (proprietary) pov it's better to keep their additions secret.

Both are fine and valid but only 1 really counts as contributing to the project.
Regards from
Tom :)


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