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Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 26, 2012 20:48 UTC (Fri) by drago01 (subscriber, #50715)
In reply to: Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica) by skvidal
Parent article: Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

> You can't blame government for thinking this was a good plan.

Sure he can. A government shouldn't do everything because "lobbyists say that this should be done" ... they should use their brains and at least apply some common sense.

But as long as people like you think "it is the lobbyists's fault" the government will remain the way it is.


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Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 26, 2012 22:41 UTC (Fri) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

Nothing is going to get fixed until the corruption is taken out of the system. You think that the lawmakers and civil servants don't want to apply common sense and do the right thing? They are in a situation where common sense and serving the public interest are not rewarded. Do you think that corporations want to spend money on lobbying instead of keeping it as profit or expanding their business? They are in a situation where they are at a disadvantage if they don't play the lobbying game because their competitors will turn the law against them if they don't.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 27, 2012 13:53 UTC (Sat) by drago01 (subscriber, #50715) [Link]

> You think that the lawmakers and civil servants don't want to apply common sense and do the right thing? They are in a situation where common sense and serving the public interest are not rewarded.

Which is exactly my point ... the voters just shift the blame to the lobbyists instead of voting the people which don't use there own brain to make decisions out. Hence nothing changes.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 27, 2012 15:33 UTC (Sat) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

This is veering off topic but I like the discussion.

You can't expect numbers of people to consistently work against their own interests as you seem to. What you can do is change the game so that legislators and civil servants can do their job without interference.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 27, 2012 15:41 UTC (Sat) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

> Nothing is going to get fixed until the corruption is taken out of the system.

You can't take the corruption out of the system. The corruption _IS_ the system.

One thing people need to understand is that a state government is as much a business as any other large commercial entity. The reason it exists is purely economic in purpose and everybody involved in government is operating on a personal profit motivation. Without lobbyists and 'special interests' there wouldn't be any reason at all for it's existence.

The purpose of state government, which is government via central authority with a monopoly on the use of violence and court systems (among other things), is to use the political means (ie, use of force) to secure economic means (whatever resources is needed to fulfill your goals) for the members of people in the government and running the government.

People will argue that it's a necessary evil because of this or that factor, which can be a entirely plausible argument, but it doesn't change the nature of the beast. The more power it has the more 'corruption' you will see.. there is no way to fix it and there is nothing you can do except limit it by limiting it's power.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 27, 2012 15:48 UTC (Sat) by skvidal (guest, #3094) [Link]

You should read up at: http://www.rootstrikers.org/

also - you seem to have an incredibly cynical view of government that may match up with some governments but certainly not all.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 27, 2012 19:52 UTC (Sat) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

Quite. It's certainly not always true of the UK: a lot of our parliamentarians are lawyers, and given the amount UK lawyers can earn, they're likely taking a substantial salary cut to be an MP instead (even if they are still earning twice the average wage). If they get into senior positions they can often earn a lot after they leave (directorships, consultancies, the old revolving door), but this is by no means guaranteed.

Power is almost certainly the attractant more than money. (Not that everybody is motivated by power any more than everybody is motivated by money -- but it is certainly *not* true that money is the root of *all* evil.)

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 28, 2012 12:12 UTC (Sun) by tialaramex (subscriber, #21167) [Link]

Representatives will tell you, and I have no reason to doubt, that most of them, most of the time, actually seek to do a good job governing. But governing is hard, and what is obvious to someone else is not necessarily obvious to anyone in government, let alone everyone in government.

The history of government reform shows that even when reform is against the short and medium term interests of some individuals in government, they will often support it if they see that it's the right thing overall. If you squint hard enough you might imagine that they see reform as preferable to some sort of bloody revolution, but in the case of a lot of historical UK reforms, at least, there was no realistic prospect of such a revolution. The Suffragettes for example, could have continued to be annoying, to cause unpleasant spectacles, march in the streets, but they did not have the means, nor any hope of securing the means, to overthrow the government of the day. Nevertheless they eventually succeeded in their aims, an all male government passed a bill giving (some) women the vote.

Women's suffrage also provides illustration that a government regulation can be arbitrary and unfair without being ill-meant. In 1929 a young woman (Jennie Lee) was able to stand for election (and win) but couldn't vote for herself because although a bill equalising the voting age for men and women had passed it had not come into force before the by-election at which she won her seat and so she was too young to vote but not too young to be elected. This situation obviously makes no sense, but you can't point your finger at any individual who planned for things to work out this way, it was an accident.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 28, 2012 17:25 UTC (Sun) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

> you seem to have an incredibly cynical view of government

That's putting it mildly.

> that may match up with some governments but certainly not all.

Generally speaking most people can't imagine things being any different anymore then people could imagine life without the Catholic church or a the king a thousand years ago. Only incremental improvements are thought possible, but nothing could ever be completely different.

There are lots of ways to have government and many ways to have government would be very positive. I think the "state government", which is the form of government that is most common in the world due to it's militarism, is fundamentally corrupt in nature. It's not something that can be fixed through voting and if you end up with some sort of armed revolution you just end up with the same thing ruled by different people.

Jailbreaking now legal under DMCA for smartphones, but not tablets (ars technica)

Posted Oct 28, 2012 19:18 UTC (Sun) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

if you end up with some sort of armed revolution you just end up with the same thing ruled by different people
Study the Glorious Revolution and its effect on the governance of what shortly became the UK and say that. It really did change things, for good.

The same is true of quite a lot of revolutions. Sure, power suckers will always suck power -- but that doesn't mean the way in which they suck power will always be the same, nor that every government is the same as every other government, and most certainly not that they are all as bad as each other! (I happen to believe that e.g. France, headgear bans or no, is a considerably better place to live than, say, North Korea, even though both have fairly large state sectors. I suspect most people would agree with me on this. You really do need to look at more than 'size of government'.)


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