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The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 12, 2012 23:21 UTC (Fri) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198)
In reply to: The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro) by pboddie
Parent article: The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

They differentiate by being one of the few vendors shipping Windows Phone at all and in a flagship device. Ideally they have a special relationship as the first among peers with the OS vendor.


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The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 13, 2012 8:05 UTC (Sat) by niner (subscriber, #26151) [Link]

"They differentiate by being one of the few vendors shipping Meego at all and in a flagship device. Ideally they have a special relationship as being among peers in the OS vendor consortium."

How exactly is the situation now better than with what they already had?

The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 13, 2012 16:04 UTC (Sat) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

Now they have a shipping phone with a small but established software ecosystem around it. I don't think meego had any future even if Nokia backed it fully, they threw away their third party ecosystem by making gratuitous API/ABI changes. If they hadn't rebooted development, hadn't merged with moblin, had shipped something in the last five years they would have been better off.

As far as choosing another os like android or webOS, I'm not sure webOS was available at the time but it could have been another good choice. The Android market is pretty cutthroat and they didn't want to be in such direct competition, there isn't much brand loyalty or profit margins in the android market, they also probably wouldn't be able to finagle special treatment from google as they did from MS because MS is more desperate for a hardware partner.

The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 13, 2012 16:11 UTC (Sat) by boudewijn (subscriber, #14185) [Link]

Originally, the reason Nokia nurtured so many third party companies to develop Maemo/MeeGo was the expectation that by doing that, they would bootstrap the whole ecosystem of companies around the platform. When I first got involved I thought that a very smart strategy, and I still am convinced it would have worked. Other parts of Nokia's strategy were pretty brilliant, too. But then... Other parts again were so bad.

I remember the sudden burst of anger in Ruoholahti when the N8 was released with Symbian on it. Nokia people I talked too were genuinely surprised it wasn't a Maemo device.

The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 13, 2012 13:33 UTC (Sat) by pboddie (guest, #50784) [Link]

Only "brand strategists" care about whether there's a "special relationship" or whether a "flagship device" is involved, especially if such a device struggles to measure up to whatever Samsung's Windows offerings are, not to mention the torrent of non-Windows devices from all the other manufacturers.

And already, the "first among peers" status has been shown to be a joke. Other vendors scooped Nokia when releasing Windows handsets and the apparently large cash transfer to Nokia from Microsoft was really money earmarked for promoting the Microsoft product. Given that Microsoft's strategy is, as always, to buy large amounts of favourable publicity and that the company has no strategic alternative, that's not much of a gift to their partners.

The story of Nokia MeeGo (TaskuMuro)

Posted Oct 13, 2012 16:09 UTC (Sat) by raven667 (subscriber, #5198) [Link]

I believe that Nokia thought their devices would struggle even harder against Samsungs Android line. Aside from Nokia and maybe HTC, other vendors Windows phones are an afterthought, placeholders in case anyone wants them but not a market they are seriously persuing.

The whole strategy depends on how desperate MS is to stay relevant and how much Nokia can get out of their "special relationship".


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