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GNOME 3.6 released

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 27, 2012 20:32 UTC (Thu) by mmonaco (subscriber, #84041)
In reply to: GNOME 3.6 released by sjj
Parent article: GNOME 3.6 released

Yeah, and they're wrong again.

Now everyone is going to start complaining that they can't suspend their computers. Is it really that hard to show both actions, make the displayed actions visible, or have the single action call up a general dialog with everything. I guess none of these alternatives are what Apple would do, in the eyes of the GNOME project.


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GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 5:37 UTC (Fri) by bojan (subscriber, #14302) [Link]

> Is it really that hard to show both actions, make the displayed actions visible, or have the single action call up a general dialog with everything.

You see what you did there? Used common sense? Tsk, tsk. Don't be ridiculous. I'm sure the now opposite lack of options (yes, hibernate is a valid one as well) on the menu was carefully scrutinised by the whole design team... :-)

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 15:54 UTC (Fri) by mathstuf (subscriber, #69389) [Link]

Isn't support for a hybrid suspend/hibernate working it's way through? That's another button[1].

[1]Though, personally, that option would be my go-to (provided hibernate worked) all the time. Still leaves 3 options: power off, power save, and logout.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 0:37 UTC (Sat) by bojan (subscriber, #14302) [Link]

I certainly hope so, given it is my patch. :-)

Your PS brings us to the most reasonable solution. Have some default menu items. Provide a way to change that in settings. So, if I want to have suspend/hibernate (hybrid or not)/power off, I can do that too. And it is not complicated - Gnome devs simply refuse to do it.

Sensible defaults are great. Inability to customise trivial things is not. And no, writing code (i.e. extensions) for every possible combo is not the way to do it.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 10:15 UTC (Sat) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

I find it amusing that many years after Emacs came to the same decision and implemented Customize to allow changing of configuration without learning Lisp, GNOME has gone the other way!

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 7:50 UTC (Fri) by GhePeU (subscriber, #56133) [Link]

I suppose that will have to wait for 3.12.

I'm still running Ubuntu 11.04 (the last 2.32 release) with selected updated packages on my work laptop (the desktop is Gentoo, so I don't envision issues there, but I'm not using it as much lately), and the support will end in a month or so, so now I will have to start researching an alternative distro.

I'm fed up and I don't have time for all this crap, I've been seriously considering getting a Win7 cd and calling it quits, after more than a decade of desktop linux. A couple of years ago I would have never believed it would've come to this.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 13:14 UTC (Fri) by thebluesgnr (guest, #37963) [Link]

If you want long term support and a desktop paradigm that works just as Windows 95 did your best bet is RHEL (or CentOS).

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 19:48 UTC (Fri) by sjj (subscriber, #2020) [Link]

You know what? I even tried that, but I found that you can't live in the past. RHEL/CentOS 6 is already old for desktop stuff.

I even used Windows for a couple of weeks (work laptop) because of Braindead Enterprise Software Vendors. Wanted to claw my eyes out soon after. That cure is worse than the disease.

Linux DEs are in turmoil right now, but the only way forward if you're a user who wants to keep using Linux, is to try to constructively engage those projects that want to hear from their users and try to influence them. And keep an open mind, not all innovations are bad.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 20:31 UTC (Fri) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

I really have zero issues with running CentOS 6.3 for my desktop at work.

What sort of compatibility issues did you run into?

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 14:04 UTC (Fri) by nteon (subscriber, #53899) [Link]

so you would switch to windows because of the power button? There are both MATE (a repackaging of gnome 2) and Cinnamon (a re-implementation of gnome 2 using the gnome 3 stack) if you don't like gnome 3.

Also, its amusing to hear a gentoo user utter the phrase "I don't have time for this crap" :)

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 15:11 UTC (Fri) by cortana (subscriber, #24596) [Link]

... not to mention GNOME 3 classic mode, which has a 'shut down' menu item that, when presented, gives you the choice of powering off, rebooting, sleeping or hibernating...

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 16:26 UTC (Fri) by GhePeU (subscriber, #56133) [Link]

No, I'm switching because at the moment I'm working with 3 browser windows (each with multiple tabs), two terminals (each with multiple tabs), three text editor windows (each with multiple tabs), multiple Tomboy notes, two evince windows and a few nautilus windows, distributed in 5 workspaces according to the activity they're related to, and I can't bear the ugly mess both Unity and gnome-shell do of my workflow. I'm constantly switching between windows, creating new windows and destroying old windows, and all this actions now involve launching disruptive overlays and clicking around two, three or four times until I find what I wanted to see because a simple per-workspace task manager is apparently too complicated and multiple windows sharing a desktop is against the new fullscreen paradigm, not to speak of the always unpredictably changing number and order of the workspaces.

Windows at least puts everything on a single workspace: messy but not actively hostile, I can live with it.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 17:53 UTC (Fri) by boudewijn (subscriber, #14185) [Link]

Pity, though, that you'll have to give up your terminals then, if you go to Windows. And it's completely unclear to me why you couldn't use KDE, XFCE or even Fvwm for your workflow instead of Gnome or Unity.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 18:55 UTC (Fri) by GhePeU (subscriber, #56133) [Link]

Ever heard of ssh? I use those terminals mostly to connect to routers, switches and servers.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 9:07 UTC (Sat) by boudewijn (subscriber, #14185) [Link]

Yeah, I have heard of ssh, but thanks for the tip all the same. Putty is decent, but not outstanding. But I use terminals mostly for development stuff, and on Windows, that's completely lacking. And yes, I also do Windows development, so I know what I'm talking about and I've tried all the options.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 16:24 UTC (Sat) by khim (subscriber, #9252) [Link]

At least putty works. We are talking about GNOME here right? I'll take Putty over the default GNOME's terminal any day of the week: at least putty does not spend more CPU resources to show me the gcc's command line then it takes for gcc to compile complex C++ code!

When I see that my terminals fully hogs the CPU core just to show the commands executed by make I weep.

P.S. Just don't try to compare Linux port of Putty with anything: I'm not sure who did that port but it's awful, yes, I know. We are talking about Putty on Windows here.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 19:29 UTC (Fri) by sjj (subscriber, #2020) [Link]

Unity is better in 12.* than earlier. No clicking - just hit super (or super-A, type for example "thENTER" for thunderbird. Took me a while to rid my brain of the notion that I *needed* a menu, but now I like it.

Or ctrl-alt-T for terminal.

Still despise the stupid idea shared by Gnome3 and Unity that you're ever only going to want one window of each type and you need right click + "New Terminal" or whatever to get a new one.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 3:39 UTC (Sat) by thebluesgnr (guest, #37963) [Link]

Not just GNOME and Unity but I believe every major UI has adopted this (even Windows), specially after tabbed browsing won over a few years ago and tabs became part of a few other kind of apps as well.

It makes sense in most cases - the exception for me also being the terminal. I simply set up the Super+T shortcut to launch a new window and that's that.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 30, 2012 1:05 UTC (Sun) by JanC_ (guest, #34940) [Link]

Ctrl+Alt+T already exists as a default shortcut for "new terminal window"...

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 29, 2012 9:00 UTC (Sat) by Otus (subscriber, #67685) [Link]

> Still despise the stupid idea shared by Gnome3 and Unity that you're ever
> only going to want one window of each type and you need right click + "New
> Terminal" or whatever to get a new one.

Middle mouse on launcher also opens a new window in Unity.

Not very discoverable, but works great and is consistent with browsers.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Oct 1, 2012 14:21 UTC (Mon) by sorpigal (subscriber, #36106) [Link]

Long ago I began launching apps from my terminal. The number of launcher docks I used shrank quickly to zero and I've never looked back. On Linux I've bound my favorite terminal to ALT+SHIFT+t and have a trivial shell script

#!/usr/bin/env bash
"$1" 2>/dev/null &1>2 & disown $!

which I invoke to launch my graphical programs. Launcher programs are overrated; my launcher panel is as long as my memory and the time it takes to find any item is a function of the length of its name (or faster, if it tab completes quickly). I expect most people (where people != users) will prefer this sort of thing once they get used to it.

GNOME 3.6 released

Posted Sep 28, 2012 19:04 UTC (Fri) by GhePeU (subscriber, #56133) [Link]

There's crap and crap, my crap, the crap I choose, and their crap, the crap I'm forced to deal with :)

Anyway my Gentoo is still working perfectly and updated as I like it 9 years and almost 2 months after I installed it, so I can tolerate the occasional breaking :)


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