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Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

Posted Sep 18, 2012 21:30 UTC (Tue) by blitzkrieg3 (guest, #57873)
In reply to: Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha by zlynx
Parent article: Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

The problem I see with this is that there is no way to know if both interfaces are on the same subnet.


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Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

Posted Sep 18, 2012 21:54 UTC (Tue) by zlynx (subscriber, #2285) [Link]

There are a couple of ways.

You could do an ARP probe to see if the DHCP server or gateway of one of the other connected devices was available. Or even ARP for the other interface IP.

You could just look at the DHCP server to see if the same one is available on both interfaces.

If the interface turns out to be on the same network go ahead and add it to the bond.

The ARP or DHCP probing would also be a good way to add locations to NetworkManager.

Or better yet, some kind of LocationManager that could use connected network information, WiFi scan results, BlueTooth, GPS, compass and/or inertial sensor data to track location.

Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

Posted Sep 19, 2012 3:58 UTC (Wed) by ebiederm (subscriber, #35028) [Link]

The standard way to detect that bonding is ok, is to do lacp.

There are other valid cases where two interfaces on the same network are ok but 802.3ad let boths sides no you are bonded, and is specified to allow for auto-configuration of bonds.

There are other games you can play but you should start with 802.3ad.

Announcing the release of Fedora 18 Alpha

Posted Sep 19, 2012 4:12 UTC (Wed) by zlynx (subscriber, #2285) [Link]

I don't want a bond for sharing bandwidth, so it does not matter that the other side knows about it. I want the bond for fail-over only so that when the Ethernet disconnects it falls back to wireless. There's a mode for that in Linux.


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