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Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Allan Day previews the upcoming GNOME 3.6 release. "I’m more excited about this release than any since 3.0. The list of major updates is impressive: new message tray, updated Activities Overview, lock screen, integrated input sources, accessibility on by default, new Nautilus. Then there are all the small changes: new style modal dialogs, bags of improvements to System Settings, a new Empathy buddy list, SkyDrive support, natural scrolling, new backgrounds, an overhauled Baobab… the list goes on and on."
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Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 13:40 UTC (Tue) by AndreE (guest, #60148) [Link]

I guess this is GNOME 3.6 "Tablet Edition"?

All joking aside, I am pretty happy with 3.4 after moving from KDE, but I'm not sure I like the direction the UI is heading. I actually like the Windows/Application selection tabs, and was hoping for some additional ones like "Recent Documents" or "New Applications". The Android Like "App" button for me doesn't seem to add much. In terms of discoverability, will an obtuse collection of squares be more revealing than a giant label that says "Applications"? It also seems to be quite a bit further away from the mouse after activating the Activities Hot corner

I understand that resources might dictate a sort of unified approach, but is it really possible to have a one-size-fits all approach to workstations and tablets? UI design has to take into account the device displaying the UI, and tablets and desktops are completely different beasts.

I'd also be interested in knowing what device GNOME is hoping will ship with this interface. Have any products or partners been announced?

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 18:48 UTC (Tue) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

> and was hoping for some additional ones like "Recent Documents" or "New Applications".

Seems like the original idea was to integrate zeitgeist and provide some journalling features for tracking activities and such.. but so far nothing seems to have materialized.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 21:31 UTC (Tue) by liam (subscriber, #84133) [Link]

I really think Overview is one of the least useful things in G3 (I rarely go to it). It could be fantastically useful, perhaps integrating something like OS X Dashboard, but it keeps getting more "designed" (i.e. little functional change, but some UX changes). As drag mentioned, Zeitgeist journal was supposed to make an appearance (there's still an extension for it though, IIRC ). Now, instead of having a really smart overview search, we're given micro-apps like Documents, or the various Media ones that've been mocked up. So it seems like Overview, while having the ability to consume arbitrary asynchronous providers, will increasingly expect that ability to go unused in favor of going to these micro-apps.
It really seems like a bit of a disorganized mess.
That said, it is still better than Gnome 2, IMHO.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 22:21 UTC (Tue) by thebluesgnr (guest, #37963) [Link]

The new Applications button is easier to access with a mouse or touchpad since you can easily slide the pointer along the edge of the screen. You don't have to do any horizontal aiming, and the vertical size of the target is at least double what it was previously.
GNOME 3 also doesn't work very well on tablets at the moment, and its mostly targeted at laptops or workstations.

Anyway, as far as I understand the original plan for the Overview was to have different tabs but it turned out to be pretty cumbersome and confusing to switch between them, and that overlapped quite a bit with the concept of applications anyway. Instead the overview is now meant to be a very simple interface from which you launch apps, open documents and files (provided by search) and switch between different applications. Interestingly it's the exact opposite of Windows 8's UI, that received such an overblown "overview" that you could easily not even leave it, and end up with two different interface paradigms inside one operating system.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 13:45 UTC (Tue) by reddit (guest, #86331) [Link]

Wow, there are sure lots of those pesky and hard to maintain features left.

I thought they were further along on their goals of presenting the ultimate easy-to-use desktop: one indistinguishable from a black screen.

Hopefully they'll rip everything out shortly, so that once there's nothing left to maintain, they can finally enjoy their well deserved permanent vacation on some tropical island.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 13:53 UTC (Tue) by corbet (editor, #1) [Link]

You know, I've certainly been guilty of bashing on GNOME. But, at this point, I think it really has gone well past the point of being useful, assuming it ever was. Can we maybe agree that, if you don't like where GNOME is going, you should run one of the many alternatives available and let them do their thing without gratuitous attacks?

clarification

Posted Sep 4, 2012 13:59 UTC (Tue) by corbet (editor, #1) [Link]

That's meant as a generic 'you', by the way, rather than being aimed at any specific commenter.

clarification

Posted Sep 4, 2012 14:11 UTC (Tue) by Zea (guest, #86552) [Link]

Mr Corbet. Im sorry to say this but I believe you are partly to blame :(

A reporter with your integrity can do much better than simply republish the blog. Taking this GNOME bashing into account LWN havent done much to put it to an end. By reading Mr Days fine blog it is evident to everyone that GNOME net added a LOT of features.

While many of us have enjoyed LWN and its many good commenters things do get out of hand when the subject is GNOME. The only way to cure it is by stating the obviuos in your articles; GNOME is adding features. It really is that simple!

clarification

Posted Sep 4, 2012 16:13 UTC (Tue) by Aliasundercover (subscriber, #69009) [Link]

Should GNOME be excluded from coverage because people like to write flames about it? Or perhaps a little moderation is enough to keep the comments civil?

I suspect a lot of people have changed attitudes toward GNOME. In the past it was my desktop and I used it every day. Now I use other software but still like to see news of its progress as a research project. Maybe at some point I will find use for it again.

clarification

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:05 UTC (Tue) by dowdle (subscriber, #659) [Link]

This wasn't an "article" nor a piece of "premium content". It was just a news item... where they are making the community aware of various happenings in the FLOSS community. They don't just do it with GNOME related content but with EVERYTHING... so I find no fault with LWN for posting this... nor with "adding" to the problem by posting this.

The sad fact is that some people are bitter with GNOME and they seem to wallow in it.

As for me, I like and occasionally use GNOME 3.x. I also like and occasionally use KDE 4.x and XFCE. It all depends on my use case. I do not feel compelled to comment and say how I like GNOME 3 every time there is a news item posting on LWN... unlike the "haters". :)

clarification

Posted Sep 5, 2012 8:41 UTC (Wed) by Zea (guest, #86552) [Link]

medias create myths about heroes and scapegoats. It is the same story for most genres of journalism. Sports, politics, and open source.

Mr Corbet did his share of GNOME bashing *earlier*, some of it justified. Today is another story and GNOME3 is shaping up nicely. The same old "heroes and scapegoats" doesnt apply anymore. Mr Days blog is full of new GNOME features but no one talks about em.

Like it or not, the comments so far is not about Mr Days blog. It is the same old talk(rant). We would be better off without the commenting. Maybe people then would actualy read the article!

Comments off please.

clarification

Posted Sep 5, 2012 9:03 UTC (Wed) by cmccabe (guest, #60281) [Link]

At this point (it may change later) I literally see no negative comments about GNOME3 except for reddit's obvious troll, and one neutral comment by someone who doesn't use GNOME3 now but hopes to in the future if it improve for his use case. Hardly a case for "comments off."

I think people have gotten tired of being negative about GNOME. They clearly have a philosophy which is different than some other desktop environments. You either buy into it, or you don't. I was willing to give GNOME3 a try: I would encourage other people to try it too. I didn't end up selecting it as my DE, but that's neither here nor there. I've talked about it elsewhere: it's probably about as interesting to you as my choice of vi or emacs, and it has nothing to do with this article.

clarification

Posted Sep 4, 2012 23:00 UTC (Tue) by cmccabe (guest, #60281) [Link]

> A reporter with your integrity can do much better than simply
> republish the blog. Taking this GNOME bashing into account LWN
> havent done much to put it to an end. By reading Mr Days fine
> blog it is evident to everyone that GNOME net added a LOT of features.

I'm not sure what you're suggesting here. Are you suggesting that negative comments about GNOME be censored? That seems to happen on a lot of other sites, and I'm glad that LWN is a "free speech zone"... despite the occasional bozo. If I have misinterpreted you, please correct me.

Also, it would be helpful if you could reveal whether you're affiliated with GNOME or not.

clarification

Posted Sep 5, 2012 11:17 UTC (Wed) by vonbrand (guest, #4458) [Link]

I doubt there is much anti-Gnome-3 censoring going on... it may be just that (i) Gnome 3 has matured to the point that it can be used by Aunt Tillie, (ii) the users became accustomed to the Gnome 3 way, and (iii) the trolls got bored and went elsewhere.

clarification

Posted Sep 8, 2012 8:13 UTC (Sat) by Pawlerson (guest, #74136) [Link]

You forget about the most probable scenario: people don't care, because they want their job being done in a more usable way, so they switched to KDE.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:17 UTC (Tue) by Zizzle (guest, #67739) [Link]

I actually read the reddit comment as quite tongue-in-cheek. It gave me a chuckle inducing and I was glad for it.

As with most jokes, there is a touch of truth there.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 23:23 UTC (Wed) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

I'm reasonably sure that everything reddit says is tongue-in-cheek. If it wasn't completely the wrong place for it it would be a fairly good series of examples of the art of sarcasm.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:29 UTC (Tue) by krakensden (subscriber, #72039) [Link]

I suspect "reddit" is a continuation of the now defunct "slashdot" troll.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 14:02 UTC (Tue) by stephane (subscriber, #57867) [Link]

reddit, please, could you read the article before adding your comment as a robot, I see many new features in this release.

By the way, I'm a happy user of GNOME 3.4 (10 hours a day) and it's great to see the new message tray, lock screen and a shutdown button (yes a real one, no hidden behind a Alt key or enabled by a extension, so many trolls could have been avoided).

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 14:16 UTC (Tue) by reddit (guest, #86331) [Link]

Indeed!

Normally, there's some nice forward progress towards removing everything, but this time it seems they are going backwards!

Although for some reason they only mention all the features they added (probably by mistake), so perhaps they actually did well and are just too modest to gloat about all the juicy feature removals that actually took place.

But hey, I just started using GNOME 3, and I'm still undergoing the process of converting to their superior philosophy to be able to fully enjoy it, so maybe I'm missing the finer points of their highly inspired thought process.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:06 UTC (Tue) by bronson (subscriber, #4806) [Link]

To block the reddit troll: My Account -> Comment Filtering -> add reddit

This could get tiring.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:04 UTC (Tue) by oak (guest, #2786) [Link]

> and a shutdown button (yes a real one, no hidden behind a Alt key or enabled by a extension

What a shame it comes only now, that issue was one the main reasons why I just switched my spouse from Gnome3 to XFCE. The new improvements look pretty cool.

Here's a bit of background. My spouse has about 5 years old business laptop with 4:3 display, Intel IGP and 1GB of RAM. She has to use Windows at work daily, her own laptop she uses also almost daily, at evenings.

I had first installed Ubuntu 12.04 / Unity to it (after Windows went bad), but that turned out to be a total usability disaster:
* There are many web sites with lots of interactive elements on left. Unity app bar constantly pops on top of those when one's mouse pointer moves a bit too much left, and there was no way to configure that to work sanely.
* All application's menus don't fit into top panel on 4:3 1024x768 display.
* The window close button being on the other side of window, is too different from Windows, especially coupled with app menus being on top panel. All kinds of close button looking elements in application windows get clicked because of that, for example Firefox "add bookmark" button.

It's pretty confusing to get "add bookmark" window when one tried to close a window...

After few weeks and seeing that this won't get better, I installed gnome-shell on top of the Ubuntu installation. That was a considerable improvement, it had none of the above issues and had many changes that actually seemed improvements.

However, eventually I switched that laptop from Gnome3 to XFCE.

Reasons:
* Gnome3 memory usage and speed in general could be better.
* No CPU usage meter for the panel[1]. When there are speed issues, CPU usage meter is an important end-user indicator on whether system is actually doing something for you, i.e. did your click go through, is the app still coming up although its startup indicator already stopped etc.
* Application menu contents was badly organized. I'm not sure whether this is a gnome-shell issue or just a problem in the Ubuntu packages, but it's much harder to find things when one doesn't know their name, compared to using traditional menus. If Gnome3 wants more users, I think polishing the Ubuntu packages would be good.
* Defaulting to Suspend instead of Shutdown [1]

As to the last point, it's not a good idea as currently Gnome is still mostly used on Intel HW, which has been much worse at power management than ARM HW. Especially in older laptops i.e. ones with not that good batteries, the battery can drain between evenings when laptop is accidentally put in a suspended state instead of shut down.

Starting your laptop and finding that it constantly warns you about battery level being below notification limit, although it's (now) plugged into AC, is NOT good usability. It gives a really bad impression on Gnome power management / usage, not just usability.

[1] As to Gnome developers recommending use of 3rd party extensions...

After considering which one is less hassle for you as a maintainer and for the user; finding / trusting / installing / maintaining 3rd party gnome-shell extension, or doing apt-get install xubuntu-desktop, the latter is actually easier.

Switching to XFCE isn't problem to normal users:
* How XFCE works is more familiar from other operating systems (and previous Linux desktops)
* It is slightly faster (especially on older laptops and with less RAM)
* Normal users don't really see that much difference between desktops because they concentrate on the applications like Firefox & LibreOffice.

Only slight problem was each click starting a new application instance (like with Windows), but that can be learned off in couple of days.

I think when considering new UI paradigms, it's good to consider how large part of the intended users uses some other UI (like Windows, OSX, Android, iOS etc) daily and which UIs are most used. There are statistics available on that, they should be used.

While differentiating in some things isn't a problem, in some others it is. Differentiation conflicting with something that large number of users uses constantly each day on some other device should be considered really carefully (IMHO mainly an issue with Unity).

PS. I do hope Gnome will never ape OSX / Unity top panel menus although there have been comments about doing that. I don't think smaller 3:4 displays are the only problem with them. Other issues are user knowing which application's menu is actually in the panel (what app is on top) etc.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:28 UTC (Tue) by luya (subscriber, #50741) [Link]

Here is my problem,
I noticed most comments got carried away by constantly bashing Gnome 3.x despite the very instruction and extensions available. Most of them keep complaining how their favourite applet/extensions are missing while aware DE was launched as core and extensibility in mind.
As for power consumption, has anyone in this comments ever submitting a bug or even writting a patch.
I think Gnome, despite its attitude, is more free and open source, than most comments and even so-called article (nothing more than crusades) are: selfiness.

Gnome 3.6 brings power off back fyi.

*rant end*

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 19:17 UTC (Tue) by utoddl (subscriber, #1232) [Link]

Here's my problem: I've want to like GNOME 3. And Unity. But like the grandparent poster, I'm the main tech support for my wife at home. We've been a non-Windows/Linux only household since WinME, and aren't likely to change any time soon. She runs Ubuntu's older LTS release with GNOME 2.mumble, and I generally run the latest Fedora. I like to play with the system; she likes to get work done. We both like changes that make her work easier. But frankly the prospect of training her on the tablet-centric UIs that seem to be in vogue these days holds no joy for me. A lot of the functionality, if it's there, is undiscoverable as near as I can tell. I can't in clear conscience suggest that switching her from GNOME 2 is going to make getting her work done easier.

I very much appreciate the housecleaning the GNOME code base has gone through, and I'm also glad the hear that expected functionality is being made available on top of that code base at last. Idealy, by the time my wife's LTS is no longer supported, GNOME 3 will be customizable and functional enough that she would hardly notice the transition. But the most exciting thing I've heard on the UI front lately from the stand point of "what to do once her LTS is dead" is that the next Fedora will ship with MATE.

To your other point: yes, I have submitted bug reports to GNOME — not about power management but about a problem with scrolling regions in VTE (GNOME's virtual terminal emulation). It's was reported in 2008, it's still marked "unconfirmed" even though the fix has been in their bugzilla since December 2010 and the VTE maintainer of the time claims to be able to reproduce it with the test code provided. I know GNOME is short staffed, but if others' experience of pushing fixes to GNOME are like this (rather like pushing a rope up a hill) I'm not surprised people are finding better uses for their time.

And finally, I have ranted on GNOME 3 issues on LWN in the past probably a couple of times more than was necessary. To the LWN community, I'm sorry. At some point it's difficult to say anything critical without coming across as just piling on. I hope this doesn't come across as a rant; I don't feel ranty as I type this. I'll be happy if GNOME makes the cut as my wife's next desktop.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 7:17 UTC (Wed) by cabrilo (guest, #72372) [Link]

We are a off topic here, and especially with reddit's tone it's a little hard to talk about Gnome 3.

However, this is my question: How can I test GNOME 3? I don't have any Linux desktop's around, and the only machine I could play with runs Debian Stable and upgrading to Gnome 3 would be a lot of time and effort. I can test the live CD I guess, but I need something more permanent so I can actually try to do some work with it. If I run it in VirtualBox, I won't have hardware acceleration and it will fall back into fallback mode which defeats the purpose of testing.

Any ideas how to try out GNOME 3? Any luck getting it to run in some virtualization software (OS X as the host in my case)? I'd like to avoid dual booting Linux on it, as I had issues before where it screwed up my partition table and I currently don't have any spare external HD's laying around.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 9:16 UTC (Wed) by sciurus (subscriber, #58832) [Link]

In Virtualbox you can enable 3D acceleration for guests. I tried it on a Fedora live CD and got GNOME Shell. However, for some reason the cpu was spending 100% of it's time servicing interrupts so it wasn't usable.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 9:49 UTC (Wed) by cortana (subscriber, #24596) [Link]

Try the live CD.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 7, 2012 10:17 UTC (Fri) by juliank (subscriber, #45896) [Link]

Try Fallback mode for her. This should work well.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 19:26 UTC (Tue) by bronson (subscriber, #4806) [Link]

To some, a discoverable "Power Off" doesn't seem like it should require an extension.

> Gnome 3.6 brings power off back fyi.

That's why Oak's article begins, "What a shame it comes only now..."

His post sounded pretty level-headed to me. If you read it as bashing, I suggest you compare it to some of the trolls.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 19:48 UTC (Wed) by oak (guest, #2786) [Link]

The main points of my long post could be summarized as:
* Several of Unity design decisions are a usability disaster for people with smaller 4:3 displays and who need to use also Windows (which works differently). I hope Gnome3 isn't going to adopt them
* Gnome3 is pretty OK and seems to be getting better, but for slightly older laptops XFCE still seems a bit better fit than the Gnome version in current distros. Especially for people who mainly use just LibreOffice and Firefox i.e. for whom maturity of XFCE default apps isn't a problem...
* Switching away from Gnome3 is easier than installing 3rd party extensions for it. Because of this, telling people who aren't gnome developers / enthusiasts to use extensions sounds like a polite way to say "piss off"

I mean, extensions are a nice mechanism for gnome enthusiasts to experiment different kind of UI features, but gnome developers shouldn't expect others to install random code from some www-site they have no experience with.

Without such code being useful/important enough to have been packaged in the distro repositories i.e. tested to work with gnome version one is using & not break it, signed etc, why normal user would even consider installing it?

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 6, 2012 8:48 UTC (Thu) by mpr22 (subscriber, #60784) [Link]

gnome developers shouldn't expect others to install random code from some www-site they have no experience with.

I expect (in the probabilistic sense) others to install random code from some website they have no experience with, even if I don't expect (in the Nelsonian sense) them to.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 15:17 UTC (Tue) by ovitters (subscriber, #27950) [Link]

I'm helping out to write the 3.6 release notes. This time it is a bit easier as I can copy/paste from various articles such as this one.

If anyone thinks something should be highlighted, please say so. Cannot promise it will go in because there is only very limited time to write these release notes (need to give enough time for the translators). Aside from writing this in proper English, just taking screenshots and doing fact checking actually takes a lot of time.

One thing someone wondered is e.g. fallback mode, so I've added a section in the "looking forward" bit. Obviously, the intend is to talk about 3.6, not future things (unless high impact).

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 17:34 UTC (Tue) by cesarb (subscriber, #6266) [Link]

> If anyone thinks something should be highlighted, please say so.

The biggest change for me would be that the menu now shows the power off option by default, instead of showing suspend and having to use the Alt key to get to the hidden power off/reboot options.

If I want to suspend, I will just close the lid or press the physical power button. The power off option is much more useful on that menu than the suspend option.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 18:45 UTC (Tue) by cortana (subscriber, #24596) [Link]

Is there an option to change it back to Suspend? I installed GNOME 3.4 on a desktop machine today. Desktop systems have neither a lid nor a suspend button so... how does one suspend a desktop machine under GNOME 3.6?

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 19:13 UTC (Tue) by drago01 (subscriber, #50715) [Link]

Hold down the Alt key and the "Power Off" menu item will change to suspend.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 19:32 UTC (Tue) by bronson (subscriber, #4806) [Link]

Could the theme for the next Gnome release please please be discoverability?

Hot corners and alt keys produce hours of family tech support.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 13:20 UTC (Wed) by pspinler (subscriber, #2922) [Link]

This, please. There should be some form of visual indication of a possible action. Trying to find what one can do via various 'hidden' hot corners and/or mode keys is difficult.

Additionally, I use a multi-machine setup with synergy, so stuff like hot corners actually break my setup. Fling the mouse to the corner (edge of screen) and it goes to another screen.

Discoverability, please. Hot corners and/or alt-keys only as a clearly labeled shortcut to a menu item or other visible action.

-- Pat

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 13:28 UTC (Wed) by mjg59 (subscriber, #23239) [Link]

Synergy doesn't pay attention to pointer barriers?

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 20:38 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

You can configure synergy to ignore spaces at the corners, but it is a bit of a pain.

Also there is a bad problem that happens when certain types of windows are maximed.. it will block synergy from drifting over. I had this issue with Gnome-terminal. I don't know if it is still a issue however. It has been a while since I last tried it.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 20:46 UTC (Wed) by mjg59 (subscriber, #23239) [Link]

Well, the expectation is that multiple monitor setups will pay attention to the pointer barriers that shell sets up - it's very easy to deliberately hit the overview hotspot even if there's a monitor to the left of it. The questions are (a) does shell set those up if it thinks it's on a single monitor setup, and (b) does synergy pay attention to them...

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 13, 2012 7:49 UTC (Thu) by ovitters (subscriber, #27950) [Link]

(sorry, late response)

I mentioned something like that after 3.0. Apparently, that some things are more difficult to discover than other things is done on purpose. The thought is gradual discovery. But to get that gradual discovery right is difficult, so I'm guessing it'll take a few more releases to improve.

Seems good to raise it again.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 21:06 UTC (Tue) by reddit (guest, #86331) [Link]

Ahhh... it is in these little details that one can see the greatness of the GNOME 3 team.

Lesser men would replace a broken design with a functional one, but they do not realize that doing so stops the engine of change that powers the whole Universe!

Instead, the truly enlightened always replace a broken design with a different broken one, so that the flow of change can continue forever unimpeded.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 2:27 UTC (Wed) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

This guy is making me feel more sympathetic to GNOME developers with each new comment. A few more and I will start sending up patches.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 9:26 UTC (Wed) by reddit (guest, #86331) [Link]

Good luck, have fun!

To start, I strongly suggest picking some highly established feature and replacing it with a semi-broken alternative that is much less discoverable and harder to use.

If they reject your patch, try making some unsubstantiated claims that your design works better with touch.

Anyway, congratulations, you are well on your way to a position on Red Hat's desktop team, where you'll finally be able to operate without the annoying constraint of having to write usable software.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 11:23 UTC (Wed) by ovitters (subscriber, #27950) [Link]

I guess the slashdot account has been banned or something?

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 12:56 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

The guy is just trolling because he thinks it's funny. The names are part of the joke. Somebody probably told him to stop acting like he is a idiot on slashdot, so he renamed himself 'slashdot'. Nowadays reddit is the new slashdot so he renamed himself that because people were starting to simply ignore him.

This is my guess.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 2:28 UTC (Wed) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

This guy is making me feel more sympathetic to GNOME developers with each new comment. A few more and I will start sending up patches.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 2:28 UTC (Wed) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

Sorry for the double posting.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 21:57 UTC (Tue) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

This is getting simply reddiculous.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 10:29 UTC (Wed) by cesarb (subscriber, #6266) [Link]

> Desktop systems have neither a lid nor a suspend button so... how does one suspend a desktop machine under GNOME 3.6?

Last time I tried under Gnome 3, a short press on the power button suspended the computer (unlike on Gnome 2, where it showed a much more useful dialog asking what to do; even then, the list of options included suspend and hibernate IIRC). That was on a laptop, but it should work the same on a desktop.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 12:43 UTC (Wed) by cortana (subscriber, #24596) [Link]

It seems logical to me that pressing the Power button would do whatever picking the default suspend/power off item does in the menu. So under GNOME 3.6 I would assume that pressing the button will simply power off the machine, naturally without prompting me before destroying all my work. I'll try it once it shows up in Debian.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 12:54 UTC (Wed) by micka (subscriber, #38720) [Link]

> I'll try it once it shows up in Debian.

Well, Debian is in suspended animation at the moment.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 4, 2012 18:25 UTC (Tue) by Ed_L. (guest, #24287) [Link]

Release notes are a thankless job. I'll thank you for them anyway.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 5, 2012 10:52 UTC (Wed) by njwhite (guest, #51848) [Link]

Sounds like things are shaping up nicely. I haven't tried GNOME 3 yet, but it sounds like it should be a fine replacement for my mum's current GNOME 2 (older Ubuntu LTS) when that needs upgrading. Will require some training, but that's OK.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 6, 2012 12:08 UTC (Thu) by ncm (subscriber, #165) [Link]

My mother-in-law is using a G3 on a laptop I set up for her. She shuts the lid when she wants to suspend, so having a "shutdown" menu pick, instead, makes _some_ sense -- although what that has to do with her name remains a mystery. (That, and "log out". Who does that any more?) My kids use a desktop box running G3. There, a "shutdown" but no evident "suspend" is as wrong as the reverse. The only saving grace is that the desktop box suspends itself when idle for a while, and the kids would never remember to do that anyway. In the old days, I would put a button or buttons in the panel to do the right thing. Some desktops make that quite a bit easier than G2/MATE does.

I really thought, at first, that the comment asserting they had just swapped "alt-suspend=shutdown" for "alt-shutdown=suspend" was meant as a joke. But it appears to be true. Who needs trolls when straight-up news provides all the mystification we need?

My son runs current KDE on another desktop machine. It has been far more vexing than G3. I keep thinking it must be fixable, and that I just need to poke around more, but I'm beginning to doubt.

Day: Taking GNOME 3 to the next level

Posted Sep 6, 2012 12:45 UTC (Thu) by BlueLightning (subscriber, #38978) [Link]

My son runs current KDE on another desktop machine. It has been far more vexing than G3. I keep thinking it must be fixable, and that I just need to poke around more, but I'm beginning to doubt.

Can you elaborate on that?


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