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GENIVI: moving an industry to open source

GENIVI: moving an industry to open source

Posted Aug 10, 2012 8:14 UTC (Fri) by fb (subscriber, #53265)
In reply to: GENIVI: moving an industry to open source by dskoll
Parent article: GENIVI: moving an industry to open source

> I just don't get the whole IVI concept.

I think the idea is NOT to serve entertainment to the driver, but to build something to show/manage:

- video feed from rear camera while parking/etc
- proximity sensor warning display, also used while parking for instance
- GPS navigation

I believe the entertainment aspect (as far as the driver goes) is to control the video display at the back-seat terminals that the children are watching (like turning it off once they fall asleep). Not very different from selecting radio stations.

The units at the back-seat will probably have a stronger entertainment aspect.

[...]

On a personal note, I used a car with proximity sensors last week, found them wonderful. There was a large warning at the display about "look to confirm safety" (or words to this effect).

I thought it was silly until I thought that many will just stop looking anywhere else. Like folks that drive into a river because the GPS told them so.


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GENIVI: moving an industry to open source

Posted Aug 10, 2012 16:17 UTC (Fri) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

What? A proximity sensor that requires you to look at a separate display to see if it's fired? (Or was this projected onto the windscreen?)

There have long been proximity sensors that emit increasingly frequent beeps when near something, like old-time movie radar. They're useful when parking.

GENIVI: moving an industry to open source

Posted Aug 10, 2012 16:33 UTC (Fri) by fb (subscriber, #53265) [Link]

> What? A proximity sensor that requires you to look at a separate display to see if it's fired? (Or was this projected onto the windscreen?)

The car had 6 such sensors ({front, back} x {left, center, right}), while the beeping would increase AND its position was simulated by the car's stereo system, the car also had a large screen display (one such 'head unit') which also displayed the car and each (of possibly many) beeping sensors.

I found checking the screen easier than relying on the stereo direction to know which was the triggered sensor.


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