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That's what dot1x is for

That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 13:15 UTC (Sun) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523)
In reply to: That's what dot1x is for by hummassa
Parent article: Cyberoam deep packet inspection and certificates

And then you need one device which doesn't support WPA2 Enterprise and you have to start improvising. And you'll get such devices quite soon because vendors can't be bothered to implement support for 'enterprisey' stuff if it's no use for most of their consumers.

I know such a company. They've deployed Ethernet/WiFi authentication using IPSec throughout the company, with smart cards for desktop logins, etc. And then they had to make it work with Windows CE-based devices (they've paid me to do this, actually). Turned out that it was easier to create a separate unsecured WiFi network and pipe everything important over HTTPS.


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That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 15:00 UTC (Sun) by hummassa (subscriber, #307) [Link]

> And then you need one device which doesn't support WPA2 Enterprise and you have to start improvising.

We already had plans in place for that (we have many such devices, especially those that do not belong to the organization). And the vendors who could not be bothered to implement suport for WPA2/Enterprise, we just don't buy from them.

> Turned out that it was easier to create a separate unsecured WiFi network and pipe everything important over HTTPS.

Sometimes, yes it is (or create a less-secured, WPA2/Personal or WPA1 protected network and go from there)... but if you plan right, you can isolate those cases...

That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 15:08 UTC (Sun) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

>We already had plans in place for that (we have many such devices, especially those that do not belong to the organization). And the vendors who could not be bothered to implement suport for WPA2/Enterprise, we just don't buy from them.
Yeah, tell that to execs with their shiny new toys.

Besides, once you implement the parallel infrastructure that actually works _better_ than your secured-down-to-the-wire IPSec network, people start asking: "Why have we even bothered with this ipsec crap?"

So that's why middlebox vendors make a killing selling various DPI tools to organizations. Sure, they violate all the possible RFCs and all the notions of protocol layering. But at the same time they actually work in RealLife(tm).

That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 15:31 UTC (Sun) by hummassa (subscriber, #307) [Link]

> Besides, once you implement the parallel infrastructure that actually works _better_ than your secured-down-to-the-wire IPSec network, people start asking: "Why have we even bothered with this ipsec crap?"

We deal with this limiting EXTREMELY the bandwidth and reliability of the secondary infrastructure. If you want to use a non-standard thing, pay the price.

> So that's why middlebox vendors make a killing selling various DPI tools to organizations. Sure, they violate all the possible RFCs and all the notions of protocol layering. But at the same time they actually work in RealLife(tm).

For a really wide definition of working...

That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 17:16 UTC (Sun) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

>We deal with this limiting EXTREMELY the bandwidth and reliability of the secondary infrastructure. If you want to use a non-standard thing, pay the price.

Nice. Increasing success by lowering expectations.

That's exactly why more and more people ditch all the 'standards compliant' crap and instead install something that is simple and stupid, but actually usable.

> For a really wide definition of working...
It gets stuff done. It doesn't annoy people. It's fairly easy to troubleshoot.

What more do you need?

That's what dot1x is for

Posted Jul 15, 2012 18:18 UTC (Sun) by hummassa (subscriber, #307) [Link]

> What more do you need?

No exposure to huge liabilities?


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