User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

Quote of the week

"Without the ability to play around, mess about with the code without consequences and privately on your own computer, you can’t be truly creative with it; and if you’re not being creative, it isn’t fun!"
Scott James Remnant
(Log in to post comments)

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 12, 2012 22:05 UTC (Thu) by daglwn (guest, #65432) [Link]

Mind-bogglingly wrong.

How did this ever make the quotes list?

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 12, 2012 22:56 UTC (Thu) by Tobu (subscriber, #24111) [Link]

Entertainingly wrong?

And while it's completely wrong for someone who has embraced Git a bit, knows that branch names are nonpermanent, repo names unimportant, and maybe knows how to do squash merges, rewrite commit metadata, restore killed lines, and reorder commits, a noob used to centralised vcs or who only uses Git through a dumbed-down (but streamlined) gui would have some reason to feel the stifling caution keybuk describes.

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 13, 2012 13:15 UTC (Fri) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

Scott didn't seem to say what was wrong with unit tests at all. They... find bugs? How awful. Personally I find writing unit tests a huge heap of fun: there's something about the bloody-minded how-can-I-break-it attitude it requires you to take to your own code that is particularly refreshing.

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 15, 2012 12:52 UTC (Sun) by man_ls (guest, #15091) [Link]

Personally I like to be the first one to exercise my own APIs; unit tests allow me to iterate much faster than waiting for external input.

If you do not have APIs then you are not writing client-side code which calls server-side code, or not writing components or classes, or scripts called by other scripts. In any of these cases I hope you are just writing toy code, where git and unit tests are not going to make much of a difference. In any other case you have APIs even if you do not call them so, and you should test them.

The original post makes lots of silly assumptions: you do not need to create a git repo right from the start, you can wait for a while before the first git init and before you start committing. Anyway nobody is going to look at your whole history to discover your mistakes anyway, unless you are Linus Torvalds and your first commit reads "starting toy project, having some fun" -- and in that case you will probably not care much.

However, the most glaring error of the whole post is right at the start:

It was pretty easy, you opened your favorite text editor with a clean, inviting blank page and a flashing cursor and started typing with no real thought about where was best to start.
What? Flashing cursor? Immediate fail!

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 15, 2012 13:16 UTC (Sun) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

Personally I like to be the first one to exercise my own APIs; unit tests allow me to iterate much faster than waiting for external input.
Quite. If you claim you got a nontrivial API right without implementing at least one and probably two or more users, you are either a highly-experienced genius or you are a liar. Probably the latter. API design is hard (and no, that doesn't mean the things should be patented, it means they should be shared more aggressively so that everyone can benefit).

Quote of the week

Posted Jul 14, 2012 9:31 UTC (Sat) by Rudd-O (guest, #61155) [Link]

Great troll post by Scott.


Copyright © 2012, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds