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CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

The first release candidate for the CyanogenMod 9.0 Android distribution is now available; this will be the first CyanogenMod release based on Android 4.0 ("Ice Cream Sandwich"). "It wasn’t quick or easy, but we are extremely proud of this release and what it represents for us as a group. The jump from 2.3.7 to 4.0.4 in many ways was a fresh start for this project, and as much as the code changed, the structure and organization of CM as a whole changed as well. It meant a lot of hard work, and late nights, but also a ton of fun. We are in this for the challenge, and the reward is always the satisfaction received when we release it to the masses as a ‘stable’ product. This RC1 brings us a step forward toward that payoff."
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CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 26, 2012 22:14 UTC (Tue) by jubal (subscriber, #67202) [Link]

I'm using cm9 nightlies on galaxy s2 since two months or so; for a nightly builds these are incredibly stable (no crashes, no problems with apps, and since quite a time full support for all built-in devices).

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 1, 2012 18:52 UTC (Sun) by Baylink (guest, #755) [Link]

Completely Off Topic: is German, perhaps, your first language?

Could you explain, cause I'm curious, the german grammar that inspires, in English, the usage "since $TIMESTAMP", when English would generally expect "since $DURATION"? I assume that's what causes it, but I've always been curious...

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 1, 2012 19:26 UTC (Sun) by apoelstra (subscriber, #75205) [Link]

As a native (Canadian) English speaker, I have always found "since $TIMESTAMP" to sound more natural than "since $DURATION". So it may just be a dialectical thing.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 1, 2012 22:10 UTC (Sun) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

It's more complex than that. "Since last Thursday" is valid, as is "since November 2011", as is "since two weeks ago": what isn't valid is "since two weeks", i.e. unadorned relative time without the "ago" marker.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 1, 2012 23:10 UTC (Sun) by anselm (subscriber, #2796) [Link]

I'm German, and I was taught in English class way back when that it is either »since $TIMESTAMP« or »for $DURATION«, German grammar making no difference between the two. So, according to this theory, »I have been a Linux user since 1993« would be correct, as would be »I have been a Linux user for 19 years«, but »I have been a Linux user since 19 years« would be incorrect.

It should probably also be mentioned that English classes in Germany tend to emphasise British English as opposed to (US) American English. People who learn English in school in Germany and then move to the USA usually end up with a weird mixture of the two, in varying proportions.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 0:02 UTC (Wed) by robert_s (subscriber, #42402) [Link]

Is this a sign of them becoming a grownup project or do they still do everything in secret?

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 1:21 UTC (Wed) by alankila (guest, #47141) [Link]

Your attitude seems strangely unwarranted given the public availability of git repositories and number of people building CM-derived releases from the work-in-progress source trees. It does not seem like this project is especially closed, though my involvement with it dates only to CM6 days. Do you have some specific criticism?

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 2:32 UTC (Wed) by rsidd (subscriber, #2582) [Link]

Indeed, I've been using CM9 since April or so, on a device that is still not officially supported.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 5, 2012 16:55 UTC (Thu) by massimiliano (subscriber, #3048) [Link]

Indeed, I've been using CM9 since April or so, on a device that is still not officially supported.

On which device?

I have tried an ICS based ROM on my Nexus One (MiUI) and it is unbelievably fast, so I think that a Nexus One can run ICS. But I have never tried to build CyanogenMod and I have no idea what it would take to build it for a Nexus One.

If you know how to do such a build, could you please send me some pointer on how to do it to "massimiliano (dot) mantione (at) gmail (dot) com"?

Thanks!

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 2:46 UTC (Wed) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

robert_s has a point, actually.

Development of CyanogenMod is a barely controlled chaos. There are tons of different trees with relationships similar to family trees of European royalty.

Then there are questions of individual devices. Their vendor trees are often filled with binary artifacts of unknown provenance (example: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=21076838&... ) and often are of dubious quality.

My Galaxy S Vibrant phone is shown as 'supported' and has an available ICS port in ROM Manager. Except that it has no maintainer and doesn't work at all.

In short, it's a total freaking mess.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 3:58 UTC (Wed) by pabs (subscriber, #43278) [Link]

You might want to switch to Replicant once they finish their work replacing those blobs:

http://redmine.replicant.us/projects/replicant/wiki/GalaxyS
http://redmine.replicant.us/projects/replicant/wiki/Galax...

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 4:12 UTC (Wed) by martinfick (subscriber, #4455) [Link]

I can't see anything in your post which defends robert_s's post.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 4:42 UTC (Wed) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

I haven't tried watching the CyanogenMod folks recently, but I've dealt with some of the same people in other forums and I think that Robert has a point.

Far too much of the Android rom community works under the 'develop completely privately and then throw the resulting rom over the wall to users' mentality. Even though the software has source available, they treat things more like reverse engineering binary firmware than software development and porting. There's also surprisingly little attention paid to what work is being done by other people, each developer releases their own system image, and when one person fixes one thing, and another person fixes something else, you are very unlikely to find a firmware image that includes both fixes.

I expect that Cyanogenmod is better in this area that the other android firmware communities as they do have a single release they are putting out.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 5:43 UTC (Wed) by aorth (guest, #55260) [Link]

> I haven't tried watching the CyanogenMod folks recently, but I've dealt with some of the same people in other forums and I think that Robert has a point.

The problem is, CyanogenMod isn't a for-profit company with employees who work 9-5; it's you, it's me, and a couple hundred other people just hacking in their free time. And forum users are... um... :)

Far too much of the Android rom community works under the 'develop completely privately and then throw the resulting rom over the wall to users' mentality. Even though the software has source available, they treat things more like reverse engineering binary firmware than software development and porting.

Well, the "Android ROM community" you're talking about pretty much doesn't exist. 90% of the "ROMs" on XDA forums, for example, are simply repackaged versions of stock vendor ROMs (unzip, replace applications, PNG files, etc); as far as custom community ROMs, you have CyanogenMod, and then a few others which wouldn't exist if CyanogenMod didn't exist. Android Open Kang Project, CodenameAndroid, etc all draw heavily on CyanogenMod developments.

On that note, CyanogenMod wouldn't exist if AOSP didn't exist. It sucks that Google doesn't develop 100% in the open, but nobody says they have to.

There's also surprisingly little attention paid to what work is being done by other people, each developer releases their own system image, and when one person fixes one thing, and another person fixes something else, you are very unlikely to find a firmware image that includes both fixes.

But that's not CyanogenMod's fault really. I maintain a CyangenMod 7 port as well as a CyanogenMod 9 port (two completely different devices), and there's no way for me to know everything that happens in every other device's port. I chat on IRC, I read the Gerrit code review, but I still miss things from time to time. There's really no way to do that better; it comes down to the individual devs.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 6:08 UTC (Wed) by tajyrink (subscriber, #2750) [Link]

I understand your points as well, but the problem is the culture of "modding ROMs" instead of building Android distributions. That culture probably stems simply from the huge user base, many of which do not have a background in being interested in long term goals like buildable, testable, maintainable free software.

Or the problem is only a problem if you look at it that way, but for example I wouldn't consider any of these random blob:d mod-monsters if I'd be looking at Android. Replicant looks good but of course has a lot of the (real) work to be done.

Sure my Nemo Mobile for Nokia N9 or even Debian for my shipping-in-two-weeks GTA04 (to a very little extent) also have blobs included, but at least they're properly packaged, the blobs are separated, the distributions are build from the sources and are being maintained according to good practices. But of course they've the GNU/Linux background. I'd welcome a bit of GNU thinking to Android world as well. Not the manifesto but the culture of building long-living projects with beautifully building code.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 8:20 UTC (Wed) by aorth (guest, #55260) [Link]

Re: modding ROMs. There's a quote which always cracks me up:

"XDA has cooks, most of them grill, pan fry, or broil...none of them develop."

Yeah, an OpenWRT-like Android ROM distribution would be cool. CyanogenMod's the closest thing there is in the Android ecosystem. Unfortunately phones aren't like routers; most phones are essentially worthless after ~2 years, and then there's a lot of heavy lifting to do when it comes to porting new Android versions to old devices. By then the vendor has abandoned the device, and the onus is on regular people like you and me to do the porting in their free time.

Many 1- and 2-year-old phones are stuck on 2.6.32 and 2.6.35 Linux kernels, and only have blobs for things like wifi drivers. This causes problems in porting/maintaining because features of new Android versions often rely on things only found in newer Linux kernels, like input drivers which send multitouch or pressure events, hardware-accelerated drawing, different wifi stack, etc. In that case there's really nothing you can do, unless you happen to have devs which get lucky, or just spend a ton of time fixing and backporting.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 8:49 UTC (Wed) by anselm (subscriber, #2796) [Link]

most phones are essentially worthless after ~2 years

I think this is largely an illusion. I have an HTC Desire (running CM7) that I bought nearly 2 years ago and it is still a very good phone. I have no intention whatsoever of replacing it anytime soon. I'm looking forward to seeing whether there will be a version of CM9 for it.

People tend to replace their phones every 2 years because their contract is up and they can conveniently get a newer phone. In this sense, a two-year-old phone may be »worthless« in an economic sense in that the mobile ISP has written it off, but it is not necessarily »worthless« from a technical point of view (such that it would not be worth supporting by something like CM).

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 12:11 UTC (Wed) by clump (subscriber, #27801) [Link]

After two years you're lucky to get any updates from your carrier. Phones aren't useless after two years if developers like aorth commit their time and effort to supporting them. I have a phone I purchased in 2010. The carrier abandoned it. Thanks to the CM developers, I can still use it with reasonable confidence that it's secure and maintained.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 22:45 UTC (Wed) by rfunk (subscriber, #4054) [Link]

You seem to be confusing CyanogenMod with the ROM modders at XDA. CyanogenMod actually is trying to be a real full Android distribution, based on AOSP.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 20:49 UTC (Wed) by Hanno (guest, #41730) [Link]

Actually, as an example, I'd simply love to know if there is or will be a CM9 for my HTC Desire.

Googling finds lots of information, all quite contradicting.

Apparently there are people who managed to port CM9 to it. It is unclear to me if these ports are official or inofficial, if they will be part of CM9 or not, etc.

I'm confused.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jul 1, 2012 18:54 UTC (Sun) by Baylink (guest, #755) [Link]

Well that's fine, but I'm not the first person to note, in public for attribution, that *Android* proper "needs adult supervision" as well.

There is *absolutely no justification* for the number of really major outstanding bugs that still exist, 3 or 4 years after reporting. Or, deficiencies: that we don't have a centralized notification manager and an app API that uses it to notify people is *moronic*; Windows *95* would let you theme notifications, fercrissake.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 8:34 UTC (Wed) by robert_s (subscriber, #42402) [Link]

Oh - how long's that been going on? Last I remember I couldn't find public git repositories.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 10:25 UTC (Wed) by alankila (guest, #47141) [Link]

Hmm. Well, I can say that public repositories have been there for a few years at the very least. The current tree is hosted at github.com/CyanogenMod/.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 7:23 UTC (Wed) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

Unfortunately, there is no Debian (or name any other community driven Linux distribution) style Android system. CyanogenMod is probably the best you can get at the moment. Even if the project seems chaotic, the resulting quality is amazing. While I would love to see a stable, transparent, open "DebiAndroid" project, but I don't think it will come. Improving CyanogenMod is a more realistic goal.

OT: Does the FM radio work now on Galaxy S? It used to work on CM7, but I'm not sure about current CM9.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 8:00 UTC (Wed) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

Apparently Debian and CyanogenMod are opposing poles of how to organize an Open Source distribution. Debian uses a very structured approach because the long term is the most important thing for it's members. CM on the other hand values quick releases (phone sets are not long lived machines like servers and desktops), and is thus gives up some organization in the name of having working stuff as soon as possible.
Is this characterization correct?

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 13:50 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

Probably.

It's also safe to say that CM has a much wider audience and possibly more users then Debian ever had.

Also CM is able to do everything it does without breaking compatibility (mostly, there are the odd bugs it introduces) with software developed for other Android phones; which is key to it's success.

I have a feeling that a 'Debian-style' system would run rampant and start eliminating and changing android subsystems in a effort to force it to conform to a political viewpoint. Which would then pretty much ruin it completely for most people.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 14:05 UTC (Wed) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

> It's also safe to say that CM has a much wider audience and possibly more users then Debian ever had.

Could you post any numbers, please?

I can't imagine, that many people would install CM, because it the installation is hard (at least on my Samsung phone), many people fear loosing their warranty, or bricking their device. To use CM one needs to be fearless geek, while Debian can be run by almost anyone.

> I have a feeling that a 'Debian-style' system would run rampant and start eliminating and changing android subsystems in a effort to force it to conform to a political viewpoint.

You mean this stupid "free software" politics and useless "open source" ideology?

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 15:36 UTC (Wed) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

There is more than a million devices using CM, according to their stats (CM can send anonymous usage statistics).

That's probably about the number of Debian users.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 15:58 UTC (Wed) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

Thanks, the stats page http://stats.cyanogenmod.com/ even shows 2.4 million, including unofficial installs. One has to add sth. to the number, if some users do not participate in the statistics.

I have no idea about the number of Debian users, less so if one counts in derivates, such as Ubuntu, Mint, etc. I would believe anything between 1,000 users (roughly the number of Debian developers) and 1,000,000,000 (roughly number of PCs in use worldwide).

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 21:07 UTC (Wed) by SEJeff (subscriber, #51588) [Link]

Call me crazy, but there are a LOT more than 2.4 million debian servers on the internets if you count the derivatives like *buntu and how it basically rules this "cloud computing" phase.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 28, 2012 1:40 UTC (Thu) by man_ls (guest, #15091) [Link]

I am not so sure: Amazon has most of the market for cloud computing, but its 0.5M servers run a Red Hat derivative (I assume it is Amazon Linux). Also, apparently there are less than 1M servers on the intertubes, and sadly not all of them are running Debian.

I don't know how many machines running Ubuntu are there; I seem to recall another million of desktops. But it is difficult to characterize those as Debian, really.

Then there are virtualized servers which are certainly Debian but they are not so easy to compute. I can create 10 instances at the push of a button; do they count?

It is indeed a tricky question. I am sure that the Debian people must have stats of how many updates they see per day, and it would not be too hard to finger-print them, but I think nobody does.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 28, 2012 8:51 UTC (Thu) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

> I am sure that the Debian people must have stats of how many updates they see per day, and it would not be too hard to finger-print them, but I think nobody does.

I don't believe Debian could say how many downloads there are. Debian is distributed by a network of FTP/HTTP mirror servers, most of them outside any control by Debian. http://www.debian.org/mirror/list shows 50 primary and 400 secondary mirrors.

But some people don't even use them. E.g. if one has a root server at a hoster such as Strato, they use by default their own mirror server to save on traffic. In my company we produce an embedded product that runs Debian and of course the installation is done using our own partial mirror. Setting up a Debian mirror is so easy (much easier than it was for me to install CM on my phone) that one can assume that there are many thousands of them in universaties, companies and even private households.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 15:18 UTC (Wed) by clump (subscriber, #27801) [Link]

It's also safe to say that CM has a much wider audience and possibly more users then Debian ever had.
I've never liked this argument because a traditional Linux distribution has vastly different goals than Android. Linux distributions are often user-installed and often appeal to a technical audience. Android has vastly different goals, and is far from a traditional distribution in maintenance and behaviour. Comparing Android to traditional distributions only makes sense in that both share the same kernel.
I have a feeling that a 'Debian-style' system would run rampant and start eliminating and changing android subsystems in a effort to force it to conform to a political viewpoint. Which would then pretty much ruin it completely for most people.
Android has benefited from those of us that ran Debian on ARM well before there was such a thing as Android. While I'm thankful for both traditional distributions like Debian *and* for Android, I certainly wish Android would be more like traditional distributions.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 15:26 UTC (Wed) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

> I've never liked this argument because a traditional Linux distribution has vastly different goals than Android.

drag did not compare Debian with Android, but Debian with CyanogenMod, if I'm not mistaken.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 15:51 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

Essentially, yes. Since it appears that the original poster is lamenting that there isn't the equivalent of Debian for Android, as a alternative to using the anarchistic model that Cyanogenmod uses.

Personally I think that Linux distributions can learn a lot from Android. Specifically: that package consistency and compatibility between distributions matters massively even though everybody pretends it doesn't.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 21:38 UTC (Wed) by rodgerd (guest, #58896) [Link]

Never mind the packaging, the ability to instal and upgrade applications independent of the OS, and vice versa.

My first Android device was an X10 mini pro running 1.6. I upgraded to 2.1. Then I upgraded to one of the Cyanogen-derived X10 2.2 releases. Then I got an Xperia Mini Pro running 2.3. Now I have 4.0 on it. Through that time I've been able to install and write applications that ran on 1.6 through to 4.0 without recompiling, and upgrade the OS under them; conversely I've been able to upgrade some applications to significant new releases without having to upgrade my whole operating system.

Desktop Linux is a pile of shit by comparison, from a user perspective, no matter how many times people stick their fingers in their ears and chant "la-la-la-I-can't-hear-you-users-don't-want-that".

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 28, 2012 9:19 UTC (Thu) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

There's actually few people that goes like that. Even some hight profile kernel hackers have acknowledged that distros have to change their desktop efforts in that direction. See https://plus.google.com/111049168280159033135/posts/V2t57... for reference.

But one thing is realizing that something has to be done, and another completely different is making it happen. Distros here are in fact part of the problem, because for many current Linux users they are "good enough".
Also, distro developers tend to like the way they do things now.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 18:57 UTC (Wed) by clump (subscriber, #27801) [Link]

For the point I was trying to make, there's not a difference between Android and CM. CM is much more transparent and friendly than its upstream Android, certainly. But it wouldn't be accurate to owe application compatibility, for example, simply to CM. CM and Android are more alike than different; they're related.

drag has a point that traditional distributions can learn from Android. Fair enough. Android, and its derivatives, could learn a lot from traditional distributions. I don't like the popularity argument for reasons I explained in another post.

I would argue that the success of Android isn't tied to its development model, its tied to the resources of Google. On the contrary, I see success despite its development model.

OT: CyanogenMod, Debian, etc.

Posted Jun 27, 2012 19:24 UTC (Wed) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

As Linus pointed out in a recent interview, it boils down to what system is shipped pre-installed.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 21:29 UTC (Wed) by robert_s (subscriber, #42402) [Link]

"It's also safe to say that CM has a much wider audience and possibly more users then Debian ever had."

I think tivo has a far wider audience than either. Which (AFAIK) manages to get by without any sort of user installable software. So clearly the whole idea of "software" is not needed at all.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 28, 2012 0:40 UTC (Thu) by pabs (subscriber, #43278) [Link]

Debian in general has a policy of staying close to upstream, except where necessary. In terms of Android, "necessary" is basically about binary blobs. Its unlikely that Debian (or CM) would have permission to distribute the blobs necessary to run Android on phones. We would have to put them in non-free even if we had that permission. There are so many of those blobs (some that may contain backdoors) and the hardware is so varied that it is very hard for traditional Linux distros to support phones. When the device-tree stuff bears some fruit and we can build one generic kernel to support every device, this will get slightly easier. Unfortunately lots of blobs means we might need to rely on old kernels that will not be shipped in Debian. Old kernels are also necessary due to many Linux patches and drivers not being upstreamed, even the OpenMoko FreeRunner (gta02) suffers from that.

If you want to run Debian (or Replicant or SHR) on your device, please join the Replicant and FreeSmartPhone folks in upstreaming patches, reverse engineering blobs and lobbying hardware vendors to release code.

Packaging the Android UI components for Debian (or any other distro) is very easy compared to the challenges of supporting mobile hardware. There are also other open mobile stacks that could be packaged.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 16:02 UTC (Wed) by criswell (guest, #40091) [Link]

> (phone sets are not long lived machines like servers and desktops)

This mentality really should start changing now that we have so many Android-powered tablets. My Asus EEE Transformer is something I certainly plan on using as long as any laptop or desktop I've owned previously.

I'm aware there's nothing quite like Cyanogen for tablets (even though it does run on a couple), but I'd argue that the Debiandroid (someone mentioned elsewhere) concept would apply much more to tablets than phones.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 18:05 UTC (Wed) by boudewijn (subscriber, #14185) [Link]

The ICS package from http://corvusmod.wordpress.com/2012/01/24/android-ics-4-0... really gave my bunch of exoPC's and weTabs (fond memory of the MeeGo days) a new leash of life. Pity though that those tablets now work so well that my daughters have plundered my stash.

Pretty amazing for that heavy, ancient, outdated netbook hardware that never, not with MeeGo, not with WeTab OS, not with Plasma Active ever gave a fun user experience.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 8:25 UTC (Wed) by aorth (guest, #55260) [Link]

FM Radio is not supported in the Android Open Source Project. Any FM Radio support you see in stock ROMs from Samsung, HTC, etc has been added by the vendors themselves. Support in CM7 had to be added by CM devs.

I don't think support exists in CM9 yet, leave alone Galaxy S. :) You can try SpiritFM from the Play Store, though. I hear it works on AOSP-based ROMs on many devices.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 12:19 UTC (Wed) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

FM radio doesn't work on CM7.1 builds for Galaxy S Vibrant. CM9 doesn't work on Galaxy S Vibrant either.

OT: FM radio

Posted Jun 27, 2012 13:46 UTC (Wed) by debacle (subscriber, #7114) [Link]

Right, now I remember: the FM radio used to work before I switched from Samsungs Android to CM7.

OT: FM radio

Posted Jun 27, 2012 13:53 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

There area few features that you lose when switching to CM. Usually due to some proprietary module or whatever.

It depends on the specifics of the phone.

I know my FM radio works just fine in CM7 for my HTC Aria (not that I ever used it besides seeing if it actually worked)

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 18:26 UTC (Wed) by Pc5Y9sbv (guest, #41328) [Link]

Why do you keep saying CM9 doesn't work at all on Vibrant?

I have a CM9 nightly build from 2012-04-17 running on my Vibrant, and haven't even bothered to update since it works so well. I figured I'd help test the CM9 release candidate when it is out, but didn't see it when I looked at their download page after the RC1 announcement.

I admit, the nightly install process was a little clumsy, requiring two attempts because the first often ends with a reboot cycle you have to break by removing the battery and then going back into recovery mode to repeat the wipe/update steps.

I've had at most five crashes in two months with this nightly, where I had to either hold the power button to reboot, or remove the battery when that didn't work. To my knowledge, that's about the same reliability as stock or CM7 for many devices...

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 27, 2012 18:37 UTC (Wed) by phetre (guest, #85360) [Link]

Same here. I've been using a CM9 nightly for several weeks on my Vibrant, with no major problems. (It does retain some minor problems from previous Android versions, mostly to do with the GPS.) Maybe your problem is with the ROM Manager app: I got my nightly build from the CyanogenMod website and installed it through ClockworkMod Recovery without a hitch.

CyanogenMod 9.0-rc1 available

Posted Jun 28, 2012 10:11 UTC (Thu) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

Well, the last time (about a month ago) I've tried ICS, I had problems with gps (it simply didn't work), phone stability (missed a couple of calls and alarms) and camera app.


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