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Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 24, 2012 20:56 UTC (Thu) by ras (subscriber, #33059)
In reply to: Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy by ortalo
Parent article: Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

You are making the situation far more complex than it needs to be. The issue is not whether the user should need the root password to make a system wide change. The answer to that is probably "yes".

The real issue is a user changing their time zone should require a system wide change. It only effects them. There are no security implications. Ergo no root password should be required. Ditto for adding a printer for the users exclusive use. Ditto for adding packages only visible to them.

The fact that these operations and others are currently implemented by making system wide changes (and thus require a root password) is the bug, not demanding the password.


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Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 25, 2012 7:47 UTC (Fri) by aj (subscriber, #39001) [Link]

Changing the timezone happens right now via changing /etc/localtime - and thus is a global option.

For a user changing his own timezone would mean changing the TZ environment variable and restarting programs...

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 25, 2012 7:48 UTC (Fri) by aj (subscriber, #39001) [Link]

I reread your comment - yes, a clever way to make a timezone change that only affects a single user would be nice. It's indeed just not there.

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 25, 2012 9:42 UTC (Fri) by dgm (subscriber, #49227) [Link]

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 25, 2012 20:24 UTC (Fri) by ortalo (subscriber, #4654) [Link]

Thanks for solving the timezone issue (imho).
Whatabout the wider issues then?


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