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Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 24, 2012 13:37 UTC (Thu) by aj (subscriber, #39001)
In reply to: Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy by pjones
Parent article: Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

What has booting and installation to do with security options?


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Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 24, 2012 13:39 UTC (Thu) by pjones (subscriber, #31722) [Link]

> What has booting and installation to do with security options?

From his initial rant:

".. and now I need to find a new distro that actually works on the Macbook Air."

Exploring options for the openSUSE security policy

Posted May 24, 2012 14:01 UTC (Thu) by jschrod (subscriber, #1646) [Link]

But from his rant it was clear that "actually works" was not meant as "boots and installs easily". Linus' term "works" had more to do with usability vs. security considerations and how they are selected.

So, if Fedora folks would share their decisions -- and the rationale behind it -- which use cases can be done without root and which need root in their DE, that would really contribute to the discussion. Telling that Fedora can be installed on a Macbook Air does not contribute.

E.g., how does Fedora handle the problem that in GNOME 3 setting the time and setting the timezone is combined into one dialog?
Setting the time zone is quite obviously a non-privileged action in most circumstances, whereas setting the time ain't necessarily so. (This GNOME 3 change caused the "ask root password for timezone selection" that Linux complained about. With GNOME 2, openSUSE was able to change time zone with one click and without authorization, since TZ change is allowed by PolicyKit.)


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