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SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

Posted Apr 12, 2012 7:08 UTC (Thu) by hppnq (guest, #14462)
In reply to: SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default by slashdot
Parent article: SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

9. LibreOffice chokes on the malicious input it read from the file.

You can't base your security model on trusting sources that can't be trusted. But maybe you're just taking the mickey.


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SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

Posted Apr 12, 2012 9:19 UTC (Thu) by Cyberax (✭ supporter ✭, #52523) [Link]

So what? If Libreoffice is properly sandboxed then it can't access other files and at most can be used to send out spam (if networking is enabled) until Libreoffice process is killed.

Of course, it leaves the problem of local vulnerabilities. But that's another story.

SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

Posted Apr 12, 2012 9:19 UTC (Thu) by renox (subscriber, #23785) [Link]

So what? If LibreOffice has no permissions, it cannot do much harm..

SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

Posted Apr 12, 2012 9:24 UTC (Thu) by slashdot (guest, #22014) [Link]

But it can't do any real damage, because it has no permissions to do so.

Also, with NX and ASLR, it should be next to impossible to actually do anything beyond crashing the application with a single document.

SELinuxDenyPtrace and security by default

Posted Apr 12, 2012 16:20 UTC (Thu) by hppnq (guest, #14462) [Link]

It's not extremely difficult to see the problem here: if you can't trust your editor if you need to edit your .profile, or if you can't trust it to properly handle its contents -- a program crash is not necessarily involved -- then what good is it to you that you have a secure way of opening it?

Who or what specifies what is or is not permitted?


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