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How not to figure out why people use alternatives

How not to figure out why people use alternatives

Posted Feb 13, 2012 11:04 UTC (Mon) by KotH (subscriber, #4660)
In reply to: How not to figure out why people use alternatives by KaiRo
Parent article: Tracking users

There is an old and tried method for this: It's called market research. There are many companies that offer services in this field. Yes, it costs money, but a well devised market research will give you a lot better understanding of what is going on in the browser market than gathering some random numbers from people without understanding what those people are actually doing and why.

I'm actually horrified by the thought that an organisation dedicated to openess is considering gathering person related data without asking the people first instead of considering other ways... Not to talk about that such behaviour is illegal in most european countries (you are not allowed to gather person related information without prior consent and have to declare exactly what data is collected, when, who has access to it and how long it is stored)


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How not to figure out why people use alternatives

Posted Feb 15, 2012 16:51 UTC (Wed) by gerv (subscriber, #3376) [Link]

I'm not sure that market research could tell us which SQL queries are running long, or which addons are commonly installed by people who are more than one standard deviation above average memory usage, or...

Asking users to describe the performance problems they see is one thing. Working out which bits of the code are _causing_ that is something you need built-in metrics for.

How not to figure out why people use alternatives

Posted Feb 15, 2012 18:31 UTC (Wed) by deinspanjer (guest, #82864) [Link]

This proposal is not about collecting person related information. It was built from the ground up to avoid personal information. It has technical features such as using a constantly changing document identifier as well as policy features such as explicitly ensuring that the IP address and previous document IDs are not linked into the data. It provides a very clear view of the data that is collected, to the extent it even provides a tool to allow an interested user to review the data and discover potential problems or useful performance or stability characteristics about their installation locally. It also provides a means for a user to delete the information about their installation from our servers if they choose, and both the client code and the server code is available as open source.


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