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How not to figure out why people use alternatives

How not to figure out why people use alternatives

Posted Feb 11, 2012 0:05 UTC (Sat) by giraffedata (subscriber, #1954)
In reply to: How not to figure out why people use alternatives by KaiRo
Parent article: Tracking users

I don't see how data only on the competitor would be any more use than data only on Firefox. Ideally, you'd want both, but with that not possible, data on just Firefox is pretty good too.

The question of why people are leaving Firefox just boils down to why people don't like Firefox, and the imagination runs wild thinking about ways these metrics would help answer that question.

About the most basic thing I can think of: if stats show half of the features you have developed are never used, you can assume that's part of why users leave Firefox. Competitors, who have market intelligence, are spending all their development money on features users want and Firefox is spending 50% of it on features they don't.

Or, over time, you see most of Firefox's decline is in uses on old computers. So maybe it's because the competitors are more backward compatible. Or maybe it's harder to install on a new computer.


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How not to figure out why people use alternatives

Posted Feb 13, 2012 11:07 UTC (Mon) by KotH (subscriber, #4660) [Link]

Gathering data and running statistical tools over it will not give you the understanding you seek. You will be just crunching numbers and find things which can be explained somehow... but how do you know that this is actually what is happening? Or to put it short: Corelation does not imply causality!


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