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The entire noSQL family of servers is based on relaxing the reliability constraints of the classic ACID protections that SQL databases provided.

The entire noSQL family of servers is based on relaxing the reliability constraints of the classic ACID protections that SQL databases provided.

Posted Feb 9, 2012 20:38 UTC (Thu) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: The entire noSQL family of servers is based on relaxing the reliability constraints of the classic ACID protections that SQL databases provided. by Wol
Parent article: XFS: the filesystem of the future?

if a single item is larger than the track size of a drive, it is physically impossible for the write to be atomic. You don't need to get this large to run in to problems though, any write larger than a block runs the possibility of being split across different tracks (or in a RAID setup, across different drives). If you don't tell the filesystem that you care about this, the filesystem will write these blocks in whatever order is most efficient for it.


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The entire noSQL family of servers is based on relaxing the reliability constraints of the classic ACID protections that SQL databases provided.

Posted Feb 10, 2012 16:25 UTC (Fri) by Wol (guest, #4433) [Link]

:-)

Look at the comment you're replying to :-) In early Pick systems I believe it was possible for a single item to be larger than available memory ...

Okay, it laid the original systems wide open to serious problems if something went wrong, but as far as users were concerned Pick systems didn't have disk. It was just "permanent memory". And Pick was designed to "store all its data in ram and treat the disk as a huge virtual memory". I believe they usually got round any problem by flushing changes from core to disk as fast as possible, so in a crash they could just restore state from disk.

Cheers,
Wol


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