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Fixed means fixed in a production release

Fixed means fixed in a production release

Posted Feb 3, 2012 0:18 UTC (Fri) by cwillu (guest, #67268)
In reply to: Fixed means fixed in a production release by epa
Parent article: FreeBSD and release engineering

A bug tracker is a tool for developers to keep track of known behaviour, not a voting system, not a trouble-ticket system, and not an order-taking system.

To be completely frank, it's not meant as a place for a user to have his voice heard. (That's why "filing bugs" is listed under "things you can do to help the project", rather than under "how to get support").

[http://www.reddit.com/r/browsers/comments/no4c7/bug_90268...


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Fixed means fixed in a production release

Posted Feb 3, 2012 10:20 UTC (Fri) by epa (subscriber, #39769) [Link]

A bug tracker is a tool for developers to keep track of known behaviour,
That's fine, but the released version is also code and also has bugs just as much as the HEAD. If bugs in the current stable version do not belong in the developers' bug tracker, there needs to be a separate tracker for them.

Really all I'm saying is that as well as the 'closed' status in the bug tracker there needs to be one for 'fixed in HEAD but not fixed in production releases'. Then developers who are not inclined to go round patching older versions can filter out that status; users and others who want to collaborate on fixing the current stable version can work on these bugs.

Fixed means fixed in a production release

Posted Feb 4, 2012 22:17 UTC (Sat) by giraffedata (subscriber, #1954) [Link]

A bug tracker is a tool for developers to keep track of known behaviour,

You must be talking about some particular bug trackers because many bug trackers are in fact for lots of other things.

Some bug trackers provide the important service of telling users what not to waste their time reporting because it's already been reported. Some provide the service of telling users what bugs they can eliminate by switching to another release or just waiting.

None of that is relevant here, of course, where the disappointment springs not from the way the bug tracker is used but from the statement of process made in response to the bug report: this isn't going to get fixed for you. I just wanted to dispute an overgeneralization about bug trackers.

Fixed means fixed in a production release

Posted Feb 5, 2012 10:45 UTC (Sun) by epa (subscriber, #39769) [Link]

Again, it's not really that the statement of process is a bad thing. An explicit policy that bugs are not fixed in the current release would be reasonable - but then, please drop the pretence of having a 'supported' stable release. What seems to happen is that a fix is checked in and the bug is closed, more out of habit or a desire to stop it appearing on the list of open bugs than as a conscious choice. This makes it more difficult to maintain the stable release in parallel with the latest development version, and makes it less likely that the bug will be fixed in stable, even if it is a professed goal of the project and its developers to support the stable release with fixes.


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