User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

XFS: the filesystem of the future?

XFS: the filesystem of the future?

Posted Jan 23, 2012 16:02 UTC (Mon) by Nelson (subscriber, #21712)
Parent article: XFS: the filesystem of the future?

XFS has been incredibly robust and reliable in my experience with it, I won't go in to details but I shipped an appliance with it and also used it on several servers since it was available until just a couple years ago. If you lose data you lose data though and that's always touchy and tough to get over, can't say I ever did though.

What stood out to me was that XFS wasn't a firstclass filesystem in greater Linuxdom, that's why I switched. the Ext2/3/4 family was and BTRFS is chosen to be the next one, should they get it worked out. I remember doing security upgrades and XFS would panic at boot time, and then with extended attributes being in different states in different distributions and such, extra security features may or may not work. I also got a pretty overwhelming feeling that JFS is all but dead and XFS was getting bug fixes but for the most part, it was "done." Running XFS effectively took you off main street and at some level made more work for you. Not sure how much that is still the case.


(Log in to post comments)

XFS: the filesystem of the future?

Posted Jan 23, 2012 17:45 UTC (Mon) by sandeen (subscriber, #42852) [Link]

It's very much NOT the case that xfs is in bugfix-only mode.

Just looking at commit logs, fs/xfs has had 830 commits since 2.6.32; fs/ext4 & fs/jbd2 have had 826. They are both very actively developed.

fs/jfs has had 114, for reference.

Commits are a coarse measure, but it should give you some idea of the activity going on.

XFS has never been as "main street" as extN, but that's a bit of a circular argument; fewer people use xfs because it's less familiar because fewer people use xfs because ...


Copyright © 2017, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds