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CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

The beta-test release of CeroWrt (an OpenWRT derivative) has been announced. "CeroWrt is a project to resolve endemic problems in home networking today, and to push the state of the art of edge networks and routers forward. Projects include tighter integration with DNSSEC, wireless mesh networking (Wisp6), measurements of networking and censorship issues (BISMark), among others, notably reducing bufferbloat in both the wired and wireless components of the stack." Only the Netgear WNDR3700v2 router is supported at this time.
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CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 18, 2011 14:55 UTC (Thu) by sztanpet (subscriber, #60731) [Link]

Yeay progress! It would be awesome to see actual businesses getting involved in this, like Bigfoot networks whose customers are usually gamers, one of the primary targets who will see a potentially significant decrease in latency.
Congrats to the bufferbloat people, and thank you for your efforts!

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 18, 2011 17:24 UTC (Thu) by emk (subscriber, #1128) [Link]

I'm going to have to buy a new router at some point and try out CeroWrt. This is very cool work, and the added IPv6 support also looks like it might be interesting to experiment with.

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 18, 2011 20:37 UTC (Thu) by zlynx (subscriber, #2285) [Link]

How do you know if your 3700 is a v2 or not?

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 18, 2011 20:39 UTC (Thu) by zlynx (subscriber, #2285) [Link]

I guess I should have looked more carefully.

On the right-hand side of the box under Package Contents it says (WNDR3700v2).

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 19, 2011 7:17 UTC (Fri) by mjr (guest, #6979) [Link]

Thanks, I wondered myself a bit how to recognize those, not having one but considering it. It's good to know it's on the box. (Now just to find some seller that actually _stocks_ them so one can check before buying.)

Or, of course, I could utilize the mail order return policy. One _could_ assume that getting a v2 is more likely these days, unless some warehouse somewhere has a large stock of v1 to get rid of...

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 19, 2011 13:13 UTC (Fri) by jg (subscriber, #17537) [Link]

Amazon's WNDR37AV's alway come through as V2's.
- Jim

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 22, 2011 0:19 UTC (Mon) by butlerm (guest, #13312) [Link]

Isn't it going to be a bit tricky to solve the most important bufferbloat problem there is (on the uplink side of a home / small business Internet connection) if you do not control the queue behind that uplink?

If you are not the bottleneck router, what can you do? Analyze all the connections going through your device trying to detect whether a queue is forming on the next one down the line, and throttle accordingly? Is that practical?

I would love to get one of these devices, but I am afraid they wouldn't do me much good, because I don't use wireless and the main bottleneck is the DSL router. I am hoping that this work will inspire the DSL modem manufacturers to clean up their act, or at least cut down the maximum queue size. I measured mine at 900 ms the other day.

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 22, 2011 9:11 UTC (Mon) by osma (subscriber, #6912) [Link]

If you are not the bottleneck router, what can you do? Analyze all the connections going through your device trying to detect whether a queue is forming on the next one down the line, and throttle accordingly? Is that practical?

If you know the uplink bandwidth and it's fairly constant, you can limit the outgoing data rate to the uplink to, say, 90% of the maximum bandwidth using standard QoS configuration. This way a queue won't build up, as the bottleneck is moved to the QoS-performing router. There's a tradeoff between bandwith and latency in choosing the optimum value, though.

I don't know if any QoS-aware routers can do this automatically. It should be possible.

CeroWrt RC5 (beta) available

Posted Aug 22, 2011 11:25 UTC (Mon) by mfleetwo (guest, #57754) [Link]

Gargoyle, derived from OpenWrt, has active congestion control which adapts to varying ISP upload bandwidth. There was also an LWN article about it.

http://www.gargoyle-router.com/
http://lwn.net/Articles/420657/


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