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The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction

The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction

Posted Aug 17, 2011 16:29 UTC (Wed) by xilun (guest, #50638)
In reply to: The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction by marcH
Parent article: The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction

"EFI is at least 95% open-source C."

The open source part (EDK/EDK2) does only contains very abstracted software infrastructure, arguably quite badly designed (e.g. you can see the hand of the psychopaths of MS putting GUID everywhere even and especially where it does not make any beginning of sense). I don't see why anybody would want to write programs for that environment.

What could be interesting to take for something which has the actual intent of booting a computer, like coreboot+its various payloads, instead of merely providing an ms-dos like os where linking is done by guid and the whole thing is burned down on your motherboard, is not open source at all. Depending on the cpu and chipset vendor, there are not even public datasheet for booting your chips.


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The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction

Posted Aug 17, 2011 16:43 UTC (Wed) by marcH (subscriber, #57642) [Link]

You are basically whining that EFI's core is not licensed under the GPL but BSD. This is correct.

> ... is not open source at all

Still whining but plain wrong as anyone can see.

> Depending on the cpu and chipset vendor,...

Usual and well-known consequence of a BSD license.

PS: we miss your fair comparison with older BIOSes.

The Extensible Firmware Interface - an introduction

Posted Aug 18, 2011 21:24 UTC (Thu) by jd (guest, #26381) [Link]

OpenBIOS is a fairly decent open-source BIOS replacement. My biggest gripe with OpenBIOS is they dumped the Forth interpreter support. Very low level interfaces are exactly what you want for diagnostics, for example, where an OS would just get in the way.


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