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Checkpoint/restart (mostly) in user space

Checkpoint/restart (mostly) in user space

Posted Jul 21, 2011 5:58 UTC (Thu) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
Parent article: Checkpoint/restart (mostly) in user space

this sounds like exactly the way major things like this work best in kernel development.

people initially propose a big, complex, intrusive patch. there is push back from kernel developers. time passes and people think more. a simple, minimal patch is created that implements a large portion of the desired functionality at a minimum impact.

the next steps are to see this added and let people build on it.

almost the exact same process happened with visualization (between Xen as the big patch, and KVM as the minimal starting point.

people wanting to get major things added to the kernel should pay attention, even if you did develop a big massive patchset, once you know where you want to end up, go back and look for the minimum that can be done to get something useful, get that accepted and build on that.

not coincidently, this looks very similar to the 'release early, release often' mantra of the bazaar development model.


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Checkpoint/restart (mostly) in user space

Posted Jul 22, 2011 21:59 UTC (Fri) by mhelsley (guest, #11324) [Link]

"people wanting to get major things added to the kernel should pay attention, even if you did develop a big massive patchset, once you know where you want to end up, go back and look for the minimum that can be done to get something useful, get that accepted and build on that."

We did that. Multiple times. The first implementation effort was primarily in userspace using ptrace and /proc. The second was Oren's in-kernel work which started out small and grew at the request of Andrew. The third was Nathan's stripped-down revision of Oren's patch set earlier this year.

"not coincidently, this looks very similar to the 'release early, release often' mantra of the bazaar development model."

There were plenty of small early releases. In fact, I seem to recall we were told to use containers@ because our frequent releases were annoying LKML folks. Releases that did the same thing Pavel's stuff does only a different way.

"Release early, release often" is not enough. There have to be people with the time, will, and influence to review and merge the work. Without that it doesn't matter what you push or how often you push it.

Checkpoint/restart (mostly) in user space

Posted Jul 22, 2011 23:33 UTC (Fri) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

the key is to make the early pieces useful enough that people will take the time to review them.

they don't have to be something that the reviewer is going to use directly, but it does need to be something that the people being asked to review will see a direct need for.


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