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But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 21, 2011 18:08 UTC (Tue) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: But that's the problem: you don't have such right... by khim
Parent article: FSFE on AVM v. Cybits

please provide a link showing the law that outlawed me making modifications to devices that I own, the link you provided does not do that.


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But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 22, 2011 1:14 UTC (Wed) by baldridgeec (guest, #55283) [Link]

Google for "Digital Millenium Copyright Act" (abbreviated as "DMCA") and I believe you will find what you're looking for.

While you're at it, look up "DeCSS" and you will find a famous instance of (ab)use of said law.

Also look for "Dimitri Sklyarov" while you're at it. U.S. law doesn't only apply to U.S. citizens and residents, nor only to events which happen in the bounds of the U.S.

But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 22, 2011 1:23 UTC (Wed) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

the DMCA is a blow against being able to do what I want with my equipment, but even that's limited to when I'm bypassing restrictions in accessing other people's work (almost exclusively music/movie media files)

the more dangerous things in my opinion are the lawsuits going after people creating mod-chips for game consoles (I really don't understand the logic there)

but if there really was a law passed eliminating the right to modify things that I have purchased (as a general statement), that would be a much bigger issue.

But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 22, 2011 1:37 UTC (Wed) by baldridgeec (guest, #55283) [Link]

So you don't see any possible argument that the way Tivo locks down the firmware is a "prevention method" which is meant to keep you from installing a custom kernel?

Even if I were more optimistic and agreed with you myself, you should note that a court doesn't even have to agree in order for them to be able to make your life hell. They just have to present an argument which is prima facie plausible, and the DMCA gives them that argument. That's where the mod-chip lawsuits are coming from anyway (and ALSO the Sony v. Hotz case, which you would have noticed if you had read the Groklaw link.)

But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 22, 2011 2:09 UTC (Wed) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

they don't need _any_ legitimate reason to make your life living hell if they decide to do so, all they need is money to pay lawyers.

I am familiar with the Hotz case.

if you decide not to take any risks, then you must completely give up interacting with anyone, let alone writing or using software

But that's the problem: you don't have such right...

Posted Jun 22, 2011 18:53 UTC (Wed) by Wol (guest, #4433) [Link]

If you don't want them making your life hell, don't live in the US :-)

If somebody tried a stunt like that in the UK they would find (a) they would get a *large* bill from the defendant, and (b) assorted people (probably *including* the lawyers) would find themselves enjoying a short stint at Her Majesty's Pleasure :-)

If prosecuting your client's case means you end up a defendant, I can't imagine many lawyers being prepared to take the money ...

Oh - and we have a case like that going through our courts at the moment. The general consensus seems to be that the lawyer involved is heading for disbarment - that he's committed professional suicide.

Cheers,
Wol

Ah!

Posted Nov 4, 2011 9:14 UTC (Fri) by renox (subscriber, #23785) [Link]

Hum, my understanding of the infamous libel case in the UK (chiropractors) showed that to be able to defend yourself in UK you need big pockets and waste a lot of your time.

So even though I'm not in the US or in the UK, your "If you don't want them making your life hell, don't live in the US :-)", even with a smiley, is very, very wrong..


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