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Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 25, 2011 1:07 UTC (Fri) by xilinx (subscriber, #50617)
In reply to: Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week) by kragil
Parent article: Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

> This really sucks, because Chinese OEMs won't get Honeycomb to put unmodified on their dirt cheap plastic tablets.

With all due respect, many of those 'cheap plastic tablets' are utter trash, and do more harm than good for the Android experience and brand. Some of these things have *standby* battery life under 3 hours - never mind actual usage.

Not saying I support Google's position here in the slightest, but don't be fooled in thinking that these terrible devices are helping the ecosystem.


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Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 25, 2011 1:58 UTC (Fri) by kragil (guest, #34373) [Link]

There might be those vendors, but as with handsets there will be others like ZTE or Huawei. They make good Android handset for half the price of Motorola (ZTE Blade or Huawei U8800 for example).

You will still have to use your brain and compare product and buy something that suits your needs (I for example would only need 5 hours of battery life) but there will cheap good ones. I am pretty sure about that.

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 25, 2011 3:10 UTC (Fri) by jmm82 (guest, #59425) [Link]

I agree there is definitely fragmentation causing confusion among consumers. I do not see a solution to this problem if google plans to Keep the system open. I am guessing they are trying to delay the crap hardware tablets.

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 25, 2011 3:18 UTC (Fri) by drag (guest, #31333) [Link]

That, or they are hacking on things that affect application APIs and they don't want developers starting to use them to develop applications.

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 25, 2011 8:43 UTC (Fri) by job (guest, #670) [Link]

Yeah. All those crappy plastic Asian PC-clones that were allowed to run DOS/Windows really tarnished Microsoft's brand. It is brave of Mr. Gates to hide his tears so well.

Irony aside, brand perception isn't everything, no matter what marketing would have you believe. Not if you're aiming for the mass market.

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 30, 2011 14:11 UTC (Wed) by nye (guest, #51576) [Link]

>Yeah. All those crappy plastic Asian PC-clones that were allowed to run DOS/Windows really tarnished Microsoft's brand.

It sounds like you meant that sarcastically, but really that's been a problem from which they still haven't escaped, and probably never will.

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Apr 1, 2011 5:19 UTC (Fri) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

Microsoft didn't really have a brand when the PC-clones started arriving. they certainly didn't have a extremely good brand that was hurt by being put on cheap hardware.

but the huge availability of cheap hardware that Microsoft software could run on took the company from being just another software company (there were a large number of different operating system companies at the time) to being the powerhouse it became

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Apr 4, 2011 16:30 UTC (Mon) by nye (guest, #51576) [Link]

Certainly, but MS still have a reputation for producing buggy crash-prone systems, when a great deal of the blame is really due to the hodge-podge of systems on which Windows runs.

They may be having to build entire blocks to fit their mountains of cash, but that all comes from being seen as the cheap standard option - the software equivalent of the supermarket brand.

(If you just mean to point out that having a brand that's not too well regarded doesn't preclude a company from raking in the money, then we're in agreement.)

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Apr 4, 2011 16:34 UTC (Mon) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

sorry, I don't see their reliability problems being due to the hardware vendors. If that was the case then sticking strictly to the top-tier vendors who explicitly partner with Microsoft would eliminate the problems, and historically it has not (yes, it reduces it to some extent, but it does not eliminate it)

Google Holds Honeycomb Tight (Business Week)

Posted Mar 28, 2011 19:46 UTC (Mon) by daniel (subscriber, #3181) [Link]

<quote>With all due respect, many of those 'cheap plastic tablets' are utter trash, and do more harm than good for the Android experience and brand.</quote>

At the very least, they help to keep the pricing pressure on. And some of that utter trash will mature into real product, look at the history of the PC revolution.


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