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Rethinking interactive fiction games with Curveship

Rethinking interactive fiction games with Curveship

Posted Mar 3, 2011 20:59 UTC (Thu) by robbe (subscriber, #16131)
Parent article: Rethinking interactive fiction games with Curveship

It sure sounds like a very interesting idea. But the examples on its webpage are a bit underwhelming -- the basic (unspinned) narrative is string of unrelated this-happened sentences. That's not a story I would like to read (or play). So either the software needs some way to go yet, or a seasoned IF author writes a better example (maybe hold a Comp?). I really wish one or both things would happen, the potential is there, let's see how far it can go without bumping into the AI wall.

A simple (I guess) but effective improvement would be to use pronouns instead of always repeating e.g. "the twitchy man". Synonyms would also be a boon. There's only one guard in this story, no need to call him "burly guard" after the first time.

Supporting other languages less regular than English will also be a challenge.

As a (big, sorry!) aside, I hate Inform 7's syntax. It replaces the familiar trappings of a programming language with english words, ostensibly to make it more palatable to authors which fear programming. Reminds me of COBOL (and, to a lesser degree, BASIC), an attempt to make programming more approachable to non-mathematicians, especially business people. I don't think replacing <a := b> by <move b to a> resulted in more people suddenly picking up programming. I b> guess replacing <Man colonel "Colon Mustard" billards_room> by <Colonel b> Mustard is a man in the Dining Room> will neither. Both English-like b> snippets read naturally, but writing them is still a strict art. You cannot b> tell COBOL to <set b equal to a> nor can you write <Also in the Dining Room b> is the male Colonel Mustard> in Inform 7.


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Rethinking interactive fiction games with Curveship

Posted Mar 4, 2011 9:17 UTC (Fri) by jezuch (subscriber, #52988) [Link]

> As a (big, sorry!) aside, I hate Inform 7's syntax. It replaces the familiar trappings of a programming language with english words, ostensibly to make it more palatable to authors which fear programming. Reminds me of COBOL (and, to a lesser degree, BASIC), an attempt to make programming more approachable to non-mathematicians, especially business people.

Well, it reminds me of Shakespeare...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_(programming_language)


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