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Choosing between portability and innovation

Choosing between portability and innovation

Posted Mar 3, 2011 5:57 UTC (Thu) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
In reply to: Choosing between portability and innovation by drag
Parent article: Choosing between portability and innovation

Linux was able to grow and prosper due to the fact that the code was portable and therefor Linux was able to run it.

If Sun had managed to get people programming just for it (the way that people are advocating programming only for Linux) back in the days when it was the premier OS, Linux would have been much harder to get started.

Linux developers today owe it to everyone (including themselves) to not raise the bar for for the eventual linux replacement higher unnecessarily.

that being said, having software take advantage of the latest features is a good thing, but the software should degrade gracefully in the absence of those latest features. This may mean falling back to something not as good, or it may mean disabling some features where there is no fallback.


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Choosing between portability and innovation

Posted Mar 3, 2011 7:38 UTC (Thu) by airlied (subscriber, #9104) [Link]

So you should have a whole lot of fallbacks that nobody is testing? and will most likely bitrot into all hell since nobody runs them except maybe some hero once every 2-3 years.

Choosing between portability and innovation

Posted Mar 3, 2011 10:13 UTC (Thu) by roblucid (subscriber, #48964) [Link]

It's called error handling, a major pain yes but robust programs have it.

If applications are no longer designed that way, then when there's a call for Linux 3.0 for some currently unforeseable reason, there'll be a terrible chicken & egg problem, which will make the KDE4.0 saga look minor.

The X redevelopments are actually a good example for need for this, as they have NOT provided uninterrupted functionality to the end users, very many complain about much breakage, and missing features over last couple of years.


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