User: Password:
|
|
Subscribe / Log in / New account

Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

Posted Jan 27, 2011 3:11 UTC (Thu) by karim (subscriber, #114)
Parent article: Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

This might be useful for web apps that try to replace desktop equivalents. A Floss version of Zoho perhaps. But the moment my data acquires value by intermingling with others' data and/or when federation is indeed required, this scheme is of little to no value. And most of the popular "Web 2.0" apps are of that kind. Even apps like Zoho tend to have a collaboration angle ... which require federation.


(Log in to post comments)

Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

Posted Jan 27, 2011 6:20 UTC (Thu) by lambda (subscriber, #40735) [Link]

These apps should be able to use both models. They can run entirely on the client side, talking only to encrypted data stores on the server; or they can talk to both traditional web apps/web services, as well as your own encrypted storage. Just like with email; you rely on your service provider to be online for you, accepting and queueing mail, but once you download it, you control the data, the program that works with it, and what you do with it.

What I'd really like to see is a good permission system for giving third-party services access to some of your data, in a reasonably fine-grained, and revokable fashion. That way, if you wanted to use a service that acquires value by being shared with others you could do so—say, a spam filtering service that learns to distinguish spam from ham on a large corpus, but limit it to read-only access of some of your mail folders, plus the ability to move mail to a spam folder. If you decide later on that it's no longer helpful, or you no longer trust it, you can revoke its access token, and it can no longer see any of your data.

Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

Posted Jan 27, 2011 9:44 UTC (Thu) by michaeljt (subscriber, #39183) [Link]

> But the moment my data acquires value by intermingling with others' data and/or when federation is indeed required, this scheme is of little to no value.

Just a thought - what about access permissions on the storage?

Unhosted web applications: a new approach to freeing SaaS

Posted Feb 2, 2011 21:38 UTC (Wed) by mich-unhosted (guest, #72652) [Link]

Intermingling with other people's data is fully possible. For instance, I may store a list of friends, with URLs for their unhosted storage and public keys to check their signatures, and I would compose my news feed by connecting to each friend's unhosted storage node. The web2.0 aspect is perfectly possible. What is hard is search. Instead of centralized search, you could implement some form of social search in apps. Or make all users together carry a DHT.

The goal is bringing free software to the web. Free software seems to be stuck in installed software (be it installed on your PC or installed on a server), and that's a shame, because a lot of software that people use nowadays is hosted. Everything we have achieved is becoming almost meaningless if you use a free kernel and free libraries and free drivers and a free browser, to access a non-free facebook, or a non-free google, to find content on a non-free youtube, or a non-free google docs.


Copyright © 2018, Eklektix, Inc.
Comments and public postings are copyrighted by their creators.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds