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Mission creep - bad example

Mission creep - bad example

Posted Oct 21, 2010 10:55 UTC (Thu) by copsewood (subscriber, #199)
In reply to: Mission creep by epa
Parent article: How not to recognize free hardware

I disagree with your spam analogy because sometimes you won't control something like this effectively by pruning the visible growth. You have to poison the less visible roots. Bindweed is a similar example.

You seem to perceive spam control very differently from how I do. The blacklisting services will generally put their blacklists into different domains based upon different selection criteria, or will provide different return codes to enquiries for different blacklisting reasons. In either case by giving the user of the blacklist information about how the blacklist is composed, it then is the choice of the user to decide which blacklists to subscribe to and how to use these.

In particular the responsibility for blocking spam isn't that of the blacklist provider. All the latter do is to publish information about their opinions as to the reputations of different email origins. Are you objecting to the right of blacklist providers to publish their opinions ?


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Mission creep - bad example

Posted Oct 21, 2010 12:21 UTC (Thu) by epa (subscriber, #39769) [Link]

My point was not that spam blacklists are inherently evil or blocking innocent people's mail or anything like that. Rather, if the list of known-spammer hosts is bulked up with the addition of other sites which are not sending spam (but have perhaps offended the list operators in other ways) then it becomes less useful for its original stated purpose, that of filtering inbound mail to discard definite junk, and fewer people choose to use it.
The blacklisting services will generally put their blacklists into different domains based upon different selection criteria, or will provide different return codes to enquiries for different blacklisting reasons.
In that case, of course, the user of the service can decide which of the blacklist categories to pay attention to. They could decide to only block mail from the 'yes, this site is definitely sending bulk mail' list and ignore the 'these people are Spam Supporters because of reason XYZ' list. So perhaps my complaint is out of date; I was still thinking of a single list.

Back to the original topic, it would be great if there were one basic 'this hardware uses with free software' mark and a separate one for '100% compliant with FSF dogma'. But that's not going to happen, at least not from the FSF.


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