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The state of Linux gaming

The state of Linux gaming

Posted Oct 9, 2010 22:20 UTC (Sat) by nix (subscriber, #2304)
In reply to: The state of Linux gaming by michaeljt
Parent article: The state of Linux gaming

Procedural generation helps here. A good few long-lived free software games (notably Nethack and Oolite) have mostly or entirely procedurally-generated content, and lots of flexibility. That way, merely knowing what can happen isn't going to spoil the gameplay, because you never know when the game will choose to hit you with what, or in what combinations.


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The state of Linux gaming

Posted Oct 12, 2010 14:58 UTC (Tue) by michaeljt (subscriber, #39183) [Link]

> Procedural generation helps here. A good few long-lived free software games (notably Nethack and Oolite) have mostly or entirely procedurally-generated content, and lots of flexibility. That way, merely knowing what can happen isn't going to spoil the gameplay, because you never know when the game will choose to hit you with what, or in what combinations.
Do you think that could also be applied to e.g. arcade or platform style games? It seems to me that it is only suitable for certain categories, but perhaps that is just my lack of imagination.

The state of Linux gaming

Posted Oct 17, 2010 21:39 UTC (Sun) by nix (subscriber, #2304) [Link]

You can certainly apply it to platform games: nethack is pretty much just a platform game turned on its side. A lot of arcade games have always been procedurally generated (the real exception here is R-Type, in which the aliens always arrived in the same order and position every time). The only domain I think you'd have no chance in is adventure games (which unfortunately seem to be a mostly dead category nowadays).

The state of Linux gaming

Posted Oct 22, 2010 16:55 UTC (Fri) by dark (guest, #8483) [Link]

Even in adventure games there is potential. I've played gearhead for a while (the console version), and it includes a "playwright" module which takes preprogrammed snippets of plot and weaves them into a storyline at the start of every game. It's still primitive (the patterns become predictable after 5-6 games) but I think the idea can go far.


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