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misleading article

misleading article

Posted Sep 17, 2010 16:28 UTC (Fri) by dlang (subscriber, #313)
Parent article: Apple's Selective Contributions to GCC

I think the GPLv3 discussion made a lot of people think twice about copyright assignment. The wikipedia exception also made people think.

The FSF promises that all licenses that they release code under will be 'in the same spirit' as the prior ones, but the GPLv3 discussion showed that what the FSF considers 'in the same spirit' is not always what the people who wrote the code consider 'in the same spirit'

Apple is doing more than is strictly required by the GPL (they could just ship the source with the binaries), so what they are doing _is_ fully compatible with the GPL.

They just aren't willing to do the copyright assignment, and the FSF has a policy to not accept any contributions that don't include such assignment, so why should Apple waste any time 'trying to get their contribution upstream' when they know that upstream will not accept it?


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misleading article

Posted Sep 18, 2010 5:50 UTC (Sat) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

What I've seen in the past is that GNU project is more flexible then others (like, say, Apache) when it comes to dealing with code licensing issues.

I don't see why it would be a problem to at least try and cooperate with the GNU folks if it has a chance at reducing the effort and cost of having a operating compiler.

And like the man said in the article Redhat still owns copyright for some stuff. Also it seems that the GNUStep folks are interested in in Obj-C support even if it is not going to be 100% the same as what Apple ends up shipping. After all their versions of the OpenStep API is not aligned with Apple's version (Cocoa) and it does not seem to bother them that much.

GNUstep and Cocoa

Posted Sep 23, 2010 17:00 UTC (Thu) by tjc (guest, #137) [Link]

After all their versions of the OpenStep API is not aligned with Apple's version (Cocoa) and it does not seem to bother them that much.

Actually, Cocoa compatibility is a primary goal of the GNUstep project. From the GNUstep.org home page:

GNUstep seeks to be source code compatible with Cocoa, it can thus be used to develop and build cross-platform applications between Macintosh (Cocoa), Unix and Windows.

If they added "less ugly" as a goal, I think they would do better.


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