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Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Posted Sep 7, 2010 23:12 UTC (Tue) by mitchskin (guest, #32405)
Parent article: Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

...Ubuntu's focus largely on refining improvements from 10.04 and Fedora introducing major changes to the infrastructure

Sometimes I think Ubuntu should use Fedora as its upstream. Fedora is starting to find its niche with the early adopters of new linux technology, and Ubuntu's niche is more in making things user friendly (which is not to say that Fedora isn't user friendly, or that Ubuntu doesn't have cutting-edge tech, just that their focus is different).

Right now, those two goals of user friendliness and new technology are pretty closely aligned, because the linux desktop world is undergoing a lot of development; the best thing to do for users is to get the latest, best technology to them quickly. As things mature, though, those two goals will diverge more and more. It'll be less important for Ubuntu to rev every six months, and the goal of making things easy for users will lead them toward more conservative choices for infrastructure.

Shuttleworth has talked about wanting to coordinate release cycles, but of course it's possible to go further and share very large chunk of the stack, if he wants to.


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Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Posted Sep 7, 2010 23:57 UTC (Tue) by ewan (subscriber, #5533) [Link]

Sometimes I think Ubuntu should use Fedora as its upstream.

In large part they do, just not directly. As well as Ubuntu benefiting from the extensive testing that new software gets in Fedora considerably before it makes it into Ubuntu, Fedora's 'upstream first' approach means that a lot of Fedora and Red Hat work is done directly in upstream projects, from whence it flows into Ubuntu, either directly or via Debian.

It's safe to say that Ubuntu wouldn't be where it is without Fedora's contributions.

Ubuntu wouldn't be where it is without Fedora

Posted Sep 8, 2010 0:42 UTC (Wed) by sladen (subscriber, #27402) [Link]

It is wonderful when everyone works (cooperatively) together, be it Fedora users finding bugs in Upstart, or Ubuntu users finding bugs in ext4 and g-p-m; and the same for Gentoo, Debian, Suse, Mandriva, ....
"Ubuntu wouldn't be where it is without Fedora"
This is precisely the concept of Ubuntu (philosophy); no man is an island: we are each where we are because of each other, and would not be there without them.

Ubuntu wouldn't be where it is without Fedora

Posted Sep 8, 2010 1:54 UTC (Wed) by drag (subscriber, #31333) [Link]

If Fedora did not want Ubuntu to benefit from their work then they would of not released everything under a open source license. :)

Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Posted Sep 8, 2010 14:40 UTC (Wed) by Trelane (subscriber, #56877) [Link]

"Fedora is starting to find its niche with the early adopters of new linux technology, and Ubuntu's niche is more in making things user friendly (which is not to say that Fedora isn't user friendly, or that Ubuntu doesn't have cutting-edge tech, just that their focus is different)."

Not really. Basically, what you have is two distros that have a more ground-breaking release (I think Ubuntu's was in April), and then you have a few polishing releases where mostly they keep the underpinnings stable and polish things. Fedora is in the groundbreaking phase of their cycle; Ubuntu is in the polish phase. Intel calls it "tick" and "tock."

Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Posted Sep 8, 2010 19:25 UTC (Wed) by rahulsundaram (subscriber, #21946) [Link]

You will probably find such major changes pretty much in every Fedora cycle. This is actually one of the quieter ones except for systemd.

Looking at Fedora 14 and Ubuntu 10.10

Posted Sep 21, 2010 22:40 UTC (Tue) by AdamW (subscriber, #48457) [Link]

Fedora doesn't have any such thing. A Fedora release is just a Fedora release. There's no planned 'adventurous' and 'polishing' releases.


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