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A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

Posted Jul 15, 2010 10:39 UTC (Thu) by wookey (subscriber, #5501)
In reply to: A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations by jmspeex
Parent article: A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

Whether this matters depends enormously on the details of how the info is presented to conference-goers. e.g at an event like FOSDEM attendees usually only have titles to go on. More upmarket events may give attendees a full programme with the abstracts in in which case an 'interesting' title is fine - people can read the abstract for the details.

I try to title/abstract a talk so that the information someone needs to decide if it is interesting to them is present both before and during the event.

The other tip I've learnt is that pictures are often better than words in conveying complex info. Which is a pity because pictures are harder to do (at least for me). And there is no substitute for practice in become good at presenting. Watching video of yourself is also informative, because you can see how much you 'erm' and gabble and fidget (all things to be minimised).


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A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

Posted Jul 15, 2010 10:53 UTC (Thu) by dlang (subscriber, #313) [Link]

even in the highest-end conference you still have the calender where there is only room for the title.

A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

Posted Jul 31, 2010 17:31 UTC (Sat) by dberkholz (guest, #23346) [Link]

That's where the magical colon comes in. For example:

Anatomy of a Failure: When the Linux Kernel Development Process Falls Apart

A guide to successful FOSS conference presentations

Posted Jul 16, 2010 10:13 UTC (Fri) by Tet (subscriber, #5433) [Link]

The other tip I've learnt is that pictures are often better than words in conveying complex info

Absolutely. Of course, it's possible to overdo it, but there are times when a single picture can convey what you're trying to say much better than merely trying to explain it. I realized part way through my last presentation that I really should have done a simple diagram to explain colorimetric intent, rather than trying (and I think largely failing) to describe it in words.


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