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Staging drivers out

Staging drivers out

Posted Oct 29, 2009 21:14 UTC (Thu) by davecb (subscriber, #1574)
Parent article: Staging drivers out

Jonathan writes: The "staging out" process may not be perfect, but nobody has posted a better idea yet.

Actually the usual process dates back to before Unix, so probably you young whippersnappers just aren't old enough to remember it (;-))

It's a special case of the process described in Paul Stachour's continous maintenance talk, at http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1640399#at
You increment the minor version number, and ship an updater with the new version that warns the user that the program is going to go out of support, and invites them to volunteer. After a while you bump the minor number and make the user confirm that they know it's going away. Then you bump it once more and make it fail. All over about a 18-month period, just like your normal maintenance.

To be fair, people who maintain linkers will probably know this trick: it's how they commonly handle format changes.

--dave (who helped Paul polish the paper) c-b


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Staging drivers out

Posted Oct 31, 2009 18:04 UTC (Sat) by NAR (subscriber, #1313) [Link]

It only works if the users upgrade always to every new release - which is not the case with the kernel, even the 6-montly distribution releases are bound to miss at least one of the 3-montly kernel releases, not to mention the Debian stable users...

Staging drivers out

Posted Oct 31, 2009 19:57 UTC (Sat) by davecb (subscriber, #1574) [Link]

Not necessarily: unwillingness to upgrade and the freedom to not upgrade is why the time periods are so long. In the commercial world, the rule of thumb is that the slower users upgrade every three years, because the hardware turns over in roughly that period.

Instead of the months I usually work with, large-systems and linkers folks tend to support old versions of things for multiple hardware cycles, with complaints in the current, forced user intervention in the second and obsolescence in the third if no-one or note enough people scream bloody murder in the first two.

--dave


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