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Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 6, 2009 3:04 UTC (Thu) by quotemstr (subscriber, #45331)
In reply to: Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3 by yokem_55
Parent article: Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

I for one neither need nor want compositing. Between the shell being part of the window manager, removing icons from menus, and requiring 3D hardware for basic desktop work, GNOME is heading in a disturbing (yet all too familiar) direction.


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Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 6, 2009 15:57 UTC (Thu) by drag (guest, #31333) [Link]

You do realize that in a very short time that newer computers will have no 2D engine at all for acceleration?

Whether anybody likes it or not even your 2D APIs will need to be rendered using a 3D engine for any sort of good performance. So I don't see a problem with taking advantage of it to improve usability.

The R200 ATI graphics engine was released in 2001. The early GMA chips for Intel stuff was released in 2004 or so...

So most average computers sold in the past 7-8 years can support good-enough 3D graphics to support a composited desktop. Even low-end machines made in the past 3-5 years or so can support composited desktops just fine.

Hell back when OS X was first released it had a composited desktop and it had no acceleration at all and it was fine to use.

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 6, 2009 16:36 UTC (Thu) by quotemstr (subscriber, #45331) [Link]

You realize that current cards still accelerate 2D operations just fine, right? My point is that graceful degradation is a critical property for a robust system to have.

Oh, and try to use a composited desktop on an otherwise perfectly-good Matrox G450: it crashes all over the place. Why should someone have to give up this perfectly good generic dual-head 2D VGA (the 3D isn't worth mentioning) card just because someone can't be bothered to write a UI without going through Composite and OpenGL?

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 6, 2009 22:05 UTC (Thu) by me@jasonclinton.com (subscriber, #52701) [Link]

s/perfectly-good/complete shit/g

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 7, 2009 3:39 UTC (Fri) by drag (guest, #31333) [Link]

Why should Gnome hold back developing and improving it's software to take advantage of modern computers because some people use older, poorly supported hardware?

If they/you/whoever does not want to run decent hardware then you should be prepared to sacrifice having the latest and greatest features. It's not like I am going to try to run a dozen virtualized environments from my netbook or whatever.

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 8, 2009 20:00 UTC (Sat) by quotemstr (subscriber, #45331) [Link]

I'm not asking for the latest and greatest. I'm asking for basic functionality on basic hardware without having to use stale software. The latest Linux kernel will still run on a 486SX, although what you can do with it will be limited. Why shouldn't the same apply to graphics chipsets?

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 8, 2009 20:06 UTC (Sat) by jordanb (guest, #45668) [Link]

Because people who work on graphical interface are mostly attention deficit teenagers who still see their computers as video game consoles that also do some other boring stuff that must be made BETTER by making the windows wobble and spin.

And anyone who doesn't see the point in getting graphics cards that cost more than the rest of the system and installing proprietary pound-me-in-the-ass drivers from nVidia are useless Luddites who can go frig off as far as they're concerned.

Mutter: a window manager for GNOME 3

Posted Aug 8, 2009 9:08 UTC (Sat) by Los__D (guest, #15263) [Link]

Don't expect the rest of us to wait, just because YOU want to use old junk.

It's 9 years old, use something that was made for that time.

(Yes, I do realize that it was a marvelous card once. It is no more)


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