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SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems

SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems

Posted Apr 15, 2009 8:09 UTC (Wed) by pohly (subscriber, #6319)
In reply to: SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems by gvegidy
Parent article: SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems

Are the specs for ActiveSync publicly available? Can it be implemented without paying royalties to Microsoft on a per-copy basis?

I looked and so far have neither found the specs nor how much it would cost to get and implement them. Considering that, ActiveSync doesn't look like a suitable alternative to SyncML for open source solutions.

Technically I cannot tell either whether it has advantages over SyncML, exactly because I haven't seen the protocol definition. I suspect that as soon as a variety of less-capable devices used it, it would run into the same issues as SyncML. Poor or inconsistent support for PIM data itself is not a problem of the protocol used to exchange it.


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SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems

Posted Apr 17, 2009 19:11 UTC (Fri) by filipjoelsson (guest, #2622) [Link]

There is an ActiveSync <-> SyncML bridge. I used it years ago with an iPAQ, and it worked ok (don't remember the name). A lot better than latter day smartphones, at least for me. The bridge let me sync with Evolution too, so no servers were needed either.

SyncML: an introduction, its potential, its problems

Posted Apr 19, 2009 11:55 UTC (Sun) by pohly (subscriber, #6319) [Link]

What you describe sounds like ActiveSync for locally connected devices. There's also ActiveSync for over-the-air synchronization. My (as I said, unfortunately very uniformed) impression is that these two share the name, but not necessarily the same protocol.

Was this bridge open source? Any chance of finding the name again? I know that Synchronica had (has?) a closed-source bridge between ActiveSync and SyncML.


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